Using a grid to draw

In our Art Appreciation lessons we love to copy great art works and images.  An easy way to accurately copy pictures is by using a grid.  Here are some of our Peerneef artworks we painted using a grid ~

Instead of drawing the grid from scratch each time, I created transparent grid lines on MSWord in several sizes which you can lay over any image.  Here’s your free download ~ Transparent grid

To create your own grid over a picture  do the following ~

  1. Download and save the Transparent Grid to your computer.
  2. Open a new Word document.
  3. Insert the image you want to use for your art work.  You need to click”Wrap Text” on the top menu and select “In Front of Text” so that you can freely move and position your image.
  4. Open the Transparent Grid doc and select and copy the grid size best suited for your image. (Use the very small blocks for very detailed pictures, or the large grid blocks for larger shaped images)
  5. Paste the grid over your image and position as needed.
  6. Save.
  7. You can work directly from your computer screen onto your own art paper or print out your image with the grid.

Here’s an important CHEAT ~ You can create a pencil sketch of your image using the free photo editing package “Picasa“.

Open the image in Picasa, select the blue icon “Even more fun and useful image processing” button, click the “Pencil Sketch” option, and “Save as”.  Now insert this outline image in your grid for even easier copying!

Prepare your own art page and create a grid to match your printout, in the same ratio of blocks across in rows and down the side, but these blocks can be larger than your printout if you want to enlarge your image.  In other words, if your grid image has 4 blocks across and 5 blocks down, then your art page should also have 4 across and 5 down.  If the printout grid lines are 2 x 2 cm, you can create your art page grid lines 4 x 4 cm (or larger) so that your new image is larger and fills your art page.

Now you are ready to sketch the image on your grid printout or on your computer screen.

  • Work block by block, copying the lines, angles and shapes in that block.
  • Use where the shapes intersect the grid lines as your measure.
  • Work with the large shapes first and then add the details.
  • Once you have your outline, gently erase the grid lines and you are ready to paint!

But there is an easier way! Art Tutor has an excellent Grid Tool that does this all for you ~ http://www.griddrawingtool.com/   Simply follow the step-by-step tutor and download and save your grid image to your computer.

So now you can recreate any image or picture on your page using the grid lines as guides to make your own art!  Enjoy!

Blessings, Nadene

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Veggie Sketches

My girls asked for an art lesson and so I opened a lesson I had bookmarked on observational sketching ~

We read “How to Create an excellent Observational Drawing: 11 Tips for High School Art Students on Student Art Guide. A really excellent article!

We looked at Sam Pickard’s art on Planet Sam incredible detailed sketches with colored blocks which she turns into amazing screen printed fabric designs. And, lastly, we  followed Jane LaFazio‘s step-by-step Tiny Tutorial – Sketch and Watercolor.

We each took our own fruit or vegetable and sketched and painted.

I sketched pears  (not a vegetable, but it appealed to me) ~

Veg Sketch 001 Lara sketched a green pepper and I love her colors and the swirly designs ~

And Kate sketched a gem squash  with lovely thick acrylic paints and added her quirky humor to her painting ~

Veg Sketch 002

A quick, fun lesson with very pleasing results!  Pop over to my Art Page for some more art plans, projects and ideas.

Blessings, Nadene

More Julia Anastasopoulos Art

We love Julia Anastasopoulos’ inspirational art!  In fact,  we  moved our first murals to fit on one wall in our passage to make space for more!

20151007_182133We spent several days during the past weeks, in our typical Charlotte Mason approach, studying Julia’s Anastasopoulos’ art on her website knolc, and we were all inspired to do a flurry of art activities ~

More massive murals ~
Kate’s created another expressive cityscape filled with fun and whimsy!

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Looking through her project gallery on her website knolc, I was inspired by  artwork which was transferred onto windows.  She used the “historical, architectural influence of Louis Michel Thibault on the City of Cape Town to create a public artwork that would work effectively on glass” which was installed in Thibault Square MiCity Bus station.44bf89551a14b53a890dfbcefa02b559My new cityscape featured our South African Cape Dutch architecture.  I added people depicting early Cape Town life. I painted my mural using acrylic ink, but I realized then how difficult it is to convert this design into something truly artistic.  In the end, I felt comfortable with my mural as a historical picture, but realized that it was not true art …

20151015_123244I think that it is only when one does these types of art appreciation activities that one truly realizes the true brilliance of talented artists.

Lara’s whimsical created this amazing picture, typical of some of Julia’s illustrations. In fact, I am convinced that Lara could become a talented illustrator!  20151001_104142-1Kate also created a lovely Julia-inspired illustration!  I absolutely love all the tiny details and all those  teeny tiny lines she used to create the grass.  Kate has definitely captured the style and feel of Julia’s art.20150928_133338-1 (1)Julia’s Shadow Boxes were the inspiration for my own shadow box picture featuring my children enjoying their childhood freedom on our farm … a collage of their happy life outdoors.  How quickly these years flash past!20151001_103709-1The next time you need some art ideas, look at your favourite artist’s gallery and try your hand at some of their projects!  It is amazingly inspiring and can open up whole new ways of doing art!

Pop over to my Art page for more art appreciation ideas, art activities and  art projects.

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Blessings,

 

Street Art Appreciation Lesson

Using Charlotte Mason’s approach of art appreciation we studied street art, and focused on two famous British contemprorary street artists ~ 

Bansky and Stik

Bansky is a British graffiti artist,  a political activist, film director, and painter, and he likes to be anonymous.  His satirical street art depict a dark humour and his works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world. To avoid arrest, Banksy’s developed his stencil technique which enabled him to create large, detailed paintings in just a few moments.

Banksy

Stik is also a London-based street artist who was homeless and lived on the streets of London for many years.  His works are recognizable for his cheerful humanoids which reflect universal themes such as jealousy, anger, love, friendship etc.  Stik’s stick figures,  despite their simplicity,  convey compassion and emotion.  He uses very simple stylistic color, painting his figures in white with black outlines on a flat, colored background. Untitled picture 1.jpg

Now, why teach about street art, you may ask?  And what is the difference between graffiti and street art?   

College & Research Libraries News defines –

The differences between graffiti and street art can be found in authorial intent, intended audience, and form. The most common form of graffiti is a tag or a graffiti artist’s signature. Tags are text-based and largely indecipherable by those outside the graffiti community. The intention behind a tag is the rebellious proliferation of the artist’s signature, akin to brand name advertising. Street art is a sub-genre of graffiti. While graffiti operates within a closed community, street art is an open invitation for anyone to interact, consider, and discuss. Furthermore, street art is drawn with a pictorial focus rather than textual, and it is rebellious but not purposefully destructive as there is intent to beautify the urban environment.” (Emphasis mine)

Should this art be banned?  Why are graffiti artists arrested?  Why are some street artists’ works protected while others are cleaned off walls?  We watched an excellent 4-part YouTube series – Graffiti – Wars: Banksy vs. Robbo  Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4 which addressed some of these questions.

Our art activity was to use Stik or Banksy’s style and create a poster to protest or make a statement on a problem, a theme, an issue, a war, or social problems.

I went into a creative flow and quickly produced 3 large A3 posters.  I used brown paper to represent an urban feel of street art.  I photocopied my Banksy-styled images in black and white on some brown paper and then added Stik-inspired characters.  I enjoyed word-play to name my posters.20150902_140752The timing of my “Migrant Waves” painting was quite amazing because the same day that I painted the poster, world news featured distressing photos of a drowned Syrian boy found washed up on sea-shore.  This photo is now iconic with the Syrian refugee crisis that has flooded Europe for the past 2 years.  
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20150902_155541Lara drew our family in Stik style –20150903_110845 - CopyLara then created another beautiful art work.  Although it is not the in the style of the contemporary artists we studied, she wanted to express her thoughts in a creative way. 20150908_113844Kate created a dramatic Ebola  poster.  You will notice her graffiti splatters and lettering and Banksy’s rat symbol.20150902_155905

We thoroughly enjoyed our contemporary art lessons!  Give it a try with your middle school or high school children!

A few more links and references:

Pop over to my Art page for more art appreciation lessons and pages.

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Blessings,

Paul Klee Landscapes

In my previous post, I shared our Charlotte Mason approach of studying one great artist and his works for a month,  we have really enjoyed the colorful world of

Paul Klee!

This week we both tried a Paul Klee-inspired landscape.

Lara chose a watercolor landscape “Oriental Landscape

Paul-Klee-Oriental-Architecture

and she created this amazing art work ~

20150831_163728

She worked with pencil and watercolors, diluting and blending her colors beautifully.  I especially love the light lines over her moon!

I chose Klee’s iconic “Castle” landscape

castle

and created my “Church in the City” painting ~

20150831_154641

I outlined my landscape with oil pastels and painted the spaces in watercolors.  Adding little details, dots and lines was just so pleasant and relaxing, and I loved my end result!  It would make an incredible quilt pattern, don’t you think?

Pop over to my Art page for more art appreciation lessons and pages and free lesson download.

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Blessings,

Paul Klee Art Appreciation

Following our Charlotte Mason approach of studying one great artist and his works for a month,  we have discovered the colorful world of

Paul Klee!

Paul Klee was a Swiss-born abstract painter castlewhose work noted for his colorful and  fantasy-style of art depicting a world of semi-abstract, dreamlike images. His style was always highly imaginative, often strange, and sometimes playful.  Klee himself defined his art as “taking a line for a walk”.

I prepared a Wall Chart page, a biography page and three art appreciation lessons, along with extra Paul Klee art examples.

Paul Klee wall chart page

Paul Klee wall chart page

Paul Klee word grid art lesson

Paul Klee Word Grid art lesson

Here are our Paul Klee “Word Art” art works ~

Paul Klee Poems 001

Miss. L 13’s Paul Klee-inspired word art

Paul Klee Poems 002

my Paul Klee-inspired word art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Klee landscape grid lesson

Paul Klee Landscape Grid lesson

Paul Klee colour blocks art lesson

Paul Klee Color Blocks art lesson

(Please note that I have updated the grid size since taking these images )

Here is your free download ~ Paul Klee bio & gallery & art lessons

Pop over to my Art page for more art appreciation lessons and pages.

If you are not subscribed, please click the  RSS Feed button or subscribe button for email notifications, so that you can have posts automatically delivered to your reader or inbox.

Blessings,

 

More Klimt Art

Following Charlotte Mason’s approach, we have continued to look at and enjoy a famous artist and his works for several weeks.  This week we enjoyed more of Klimt’s amazing art.

Once again, as we did with our Klimt’s Tree of Life, I printed out outline pictures of some of his works and we sat quietly painting while we listened to music.

6b591e7ed246d35933536b116e2dc84bKlimt-Line-Art-803x1024-e1418510792805

Kate and I both did the same picture, but each of us followed a different approach.

Kate painted hers in dazzling acrylic colors and gold, 
Kilmt Art1

Kilmt Art 003

while I studied the original painting and applied similar colors with gold paint.Kilmt Art2

Kilmt Art 001

Lara chose to do a Klimt picture of mother and child, and she stunned me with her beautiful technique.coloriage-klimtKilmt Art

Kilmt Art 002

Simple and beautiful, isn’t it?

Art appreciation is really do-able!  Give these ideas a try!

Blessings,

 

 

New Music and Art Timeline

I created a new Music and Art Timeline.  Music & Art Timeline Cover This is a helpful Fine Arts tool, identifying both famous musicians and their music styles, as well as famous artists and their masterpieces displayed in parallel.

How to use the timeline:

  • Print out and bind as is, or add to a Book of Centuries.
  • Cut and paste the pages side-by-side/ under each other as a visual Fine Arts timeline.
  • Add art work thumbnails to a timeline on a wall.
  • Cut the art works and paste them on cards and let children match the artists to the eras.

You will find your free download on my Free Page ~ Art Era Timeline, fresh and newly updated!

Recently Homeschool Freebies of the Day featured my Art Era Timelines to email subscribers.  Subscribers often get links to special freebies that you will not find openly on Internet, so it is worth joining their subscription list!

Blessings,

 

 

Reader’s Question ~ Art Appreciation with Boys?

This week I would like to share another interesting reader’s question.  
She asks ~
What would you suggest I use as a start to art appreciation for my 6-year-old and 4-year-old sons?   I am not a natural artist and I was never really exposed to art, but I would love to share art with my boys. Are boys even interested in fine arts?
She also asked about purchasing art products, curriculums and art lesson books.
Here are some of my suggestions ~p1130060.jpg (1280×960)
  • It is really not necessary to buy any art formal curriculum at this stage. While packages, books and programs are often a great blessing to moms with little confidence or art experience, it is really not necessary to spend much/any money on your art appreciation lessons.
  • Pop over to my Art Appreciation pages for inspiration for art lessons, activities, links and outlines of famous artworks.
  • For free lessons, I highly recommend Patti’s “All Things Bright and Beautiful” because she prepares a weekly picture, classical music selection and poems with all the Internet links.  Subscribe to her blog and you will receive her emails each week.
  • Read Simply Charlotte Mason post Teaching Art Subject By Subject on how to do your picture study and teaching art expression.
  • Barb at Harmony Fine Art has Fine Art Plans to purchase, but she shares loads of free artist study ideas and lessons!
  • Jimmie of Jimmie’s Collage shares her free Charlotte Mason Artist Study lessons, ideas and links.
  • Use what you have or borrow books from the library and select an interesting artist and look at his work for a brief lesson once a week.
  • Don’t worry about being able to paint or do art either.  Simply enjoy the art activity with your kids. We LOVE doing Sketch Tuesday each week!
  • Find stuff that is fun and non-threatening for your kids and do it along with them!
  • There are tons of YouTube videos and blog with ideas and tutorials, but, again, keep things loose and informal and encourage participation without stressing about “doing it right”.
  • ALL children can enjoy art appreciation.  Some artists, topics or techniques lend themselves more to boys, while others, girls may find more interesting.  Select interesting art – especially the subject matter.  Vary the type of media or art studied.  It may be typical to assume that boys may enjoy the physical, messy art lessons, while girls may prefer “pretty” art.  I have found that everyone forms a personal reaction and response to art.  It is a subjective experience.  That is what makes it so special.
  • Art appreciation doesn’t mean that you or your kids have to “like” every art piece!  My youngest daughter hated  most of Picasso’s art!  But, she can recognize his works!  Ironically, her Guitar Collage art appreciation activity was chosen from an international search for a child’s art work for a poster!
Lastly, please may I encourage you not to KILL art and music appreciation!   I ruined my eldest daughters simple joy for art & music appreciation and nature study by trying to make every encounter a formal lesson with a notebook page, narration or activity to show how much she had learnt.  I came on too strong and too ‘teachy’.   have learnt my lesson!  Keep it really informal and relaxed.  If your child shows any real interest, then by all means, take your time to research, read references and look for other examples.  Even a very informal quick lesson has rich and lasting impacts on our children.
What other suggestions would you give this reader?  Please share in the comments below.
Blessings,
 

Sketch Tuesday ~ Picasso Guitars

Summer Art

instead of Sketch Tuesday.

Barb of Harmony Fine Arts has focused a summer art study of Pablo Picasso.  This week her theme is “Picasso’s 3 Musicians“.

Pop over to her post to follow all her Picasso guitar links and instructions.

Miss.L12 and I fondly remembered our study of Picasso’s three “Musicians with Masks“, and we recalled Miss.L12 Picasso-inspired cubist guitar collage that became a famous poster and program cover!

This week we really enjoyed the “Partition, Bottle of Port, Guitar, Playing Cards” and I tweaked our art lesson using this painting as our main inspiration.

partition-bottle-of-port-guitar-playing-cards-1917

  1. Draw a guitar outline on an A4 page so that it almost touches all the sides.
  2. Place the guitar outline page inside a large A3 page and fold the pages in half and then continue to fold the pages randomly, creating creases through both pages.
  3. Unfold and flatten the pages.  These creases will form lines which we will use to change colors.
  4. Cut out the guitar shape and glue it onto the large page.
  5. Draw the objects and background shapes.
  6. Paint the background and objects, the guitar and details in Picasso-style.

Art Picasso guitars1

Art Picasso guitarsThere’s still time to do art this weekend and send it in for the slide show … or just for fun!  Thanks, Barb, for your amazing art inspiration!

See you at the slide show!

Blessings,