Not Qualified to Homeschool?

Encouraging new homeschoolers ~

A reader recently wrote and asked,
“I’m not qualified as a teacher.   I have 3 young children and want to start homeschooling. What do you recommend?”

Let me start with this statement20140811_125422 ~  YOU CAN HOMESCHOOL YOUR OWN CHILDREN! You are already educating your children as you intimately know your children and adapt to their needs, interests and abilities.  You don’t need certification, experience or qualifications to educate them if you are able to follow some basic principles, and approaches.  If you read good parenting and education books you will gain excellent perspective and understanding on how your child learns and how you can initiate or facilitate their interests and explorations.  Some homeschool curriculums are so well-designed and prepared that you will easily be able to facilitate your child’s learning.

I can fully understand how uncertain and insecure you must feel.  Even as a qualified, professional teacher, I experienced the same fears and failures in my first year teaching.  Here’s my story   ~

I qualified with a 4 year Diploma of Higher Education with subject majors and a specialization in remedial education as a senior primary (middle school) teacher.  When I received my first teaching post, the school appointed me to a junior primary class and I was completely ill-equipped!  I had absolutely no idea how to teach these young, little kids to write, read, do phonics or practice numeracy!  Even with the lesson preparation planned out for me, I had no idea how to actually implement the lessons.  I used to stand on tip-toe to  peep into my neighbouring teacher’s classroom to see how she taught her classes and try copy her in my class!  It was a real disaster!  Six months later, when a senior primary teacher was transferred to another school, I begged for her classes and was promptly “promoted” to senior primary where I flourished!

After teaching at public schools for 10 years and completing a Bachelor of Arts Degree,  I became a stay-at-home mom started homeschooling my young children.  All my years of teaching experience and study did not help me.  In fact it was a hindrance!

My first homeschooling year looked like “school-at-home” and I rigorously implemented Sonlight’s  packaged curriculum.  I religiously stuck to their schedule, and stressed and juggled to try implement the 3 separate cores I bought for each child and we all nearly burnt out!  Wonderfully, during this first year I also read amazing education and parenting books and slowly realized that I needed to loosen up, look for the learning spark or moment and fan that flame to encourage my children to explore and discover their own interests and creative passions.

My children learnt despite my best and worst efforts.  Two years later we spent 18 20140603_121902months on the road travelling around South Africa.  I wisely put all the children on just one core and followed Footprints On Our Land .  I learnt that even if we travelled and missed formal schooling days we didn’t fall behind.   I simply extended the schedule to cover 18 months instead of 1 year!  We loved the flow and natural learning that came with reading amazing books, visiting people and places and being creative.

So what do you need to have to qualify as a good homeschooler?

  • Relationship.  Be attached and connected, involved and encouraging of each child.  Know your children, their weakness, fears, anxieties, learning styles, interests, and passions.   This is true for any great parent, even if your child attends public school!
  • Facilitator.  Your purpose is to observe and listen to what they love to do, what they love to learn, and to encourage, initiate ideas, and help them explore and discover what interests them.  Give them time and space to explore, discover, create, make a mess, make mistakes, and make it their own.  Ask them what they want to learn and allow them to choose subjects, topics, books and approaches and then tailor-make their education.  Think of child-led learning.
  • Basic skills. Teach them with short, clear instructions and then let them apply it in their learning.  Give them examples of how to work with equipment, tools, materials and methods.  Show them how to be safe and keep things clean and in working order when finished.  Think of practical life skills such as washing, cleaning, using kitchen equipment, sewing, handwork, use a variety arts and crafts materials.  Teach more specific educational skills such as how to use a microscope or maths equipment .  If you don’t know how, find someone who can and learn together with your kids.  Often my kids find out for themselves in the Internet or from friends.
  • Read aloud with expression.  This may be your greatest teaching tool!  We have always learnt through living books and great literature.  I still read aloud every day to my high schooler and our family loves to read.  Even when everything else seems uncertain and failing, read alouds have kept us going strong.  It has been our homeschool glue!  Start while your kids are very young and just keep updating your library, looking for relevant, engaging books as they grow older.  There are dozens of book lists for children of every age.  Ambleside Online is a free Charlotte Mason education based primarily on book lists for each year.
  • Keep the young years fun!  Avoid making homeschool about desk work, days of dry, dull, long lessons.  Do hands-on activities, play, get dirty, have fun, sing, laugh and play.   Avoid curriculums that require strict marking, tests and exams.  This approach is not necessary until your children reach highschool.  Only in the final 3 years of highschool do you need to settle into a more focussed academic approach.

When buying a curriculum, most new homeschool parents buy the full bells-and-whistles packages.  This is a great help, but I urge you to adapt it and make it fit your family.

Here’s my best advice to new curriculum package users ~

  • One core – try put as many children of similar ages together on the same core.  Some years a young or older child may require the focus of the core, but generally go on a family adventure on the same read alouds.
  • Individual Reading, Maths and Spelling – each child on their own learning levels and pace for handwriting, phonics, reading, spelling and maths.
  • Short sweet lessons – For the 3R’s read how to keep lessons short – only 10 to 15 minutes long.
  • 4-Day-Schedule – plan for one free day to do extras, outings, co-ops, nature walks, fine arts and personal free time.  This will keep you and your children fresh and sane!
  • Start slowly – don’t pile into the full package.  Ease into the program over weeks even months.  Start with the best, juicy parts like the reading aloud and the main core books.  Each day work through this and then add a new subject each week.  Give yourself and your kids time to find your family’s natural rhythm and flow.  It doesn’t matter if some subjects are “behind” for a while.  You can focus on lagging subjects and catch up easily in a few days or a week!
  • Tweak the package for each child and use the schedule uniquely and individually instead of trying to make your kids and yourself fit into someone else’s learning plan.  Think of the schedule as an outline, prompt or suggestion.  It is the general road-map. Make the journey yours!

You CAN DO THIS!

Wishing you all grace and courage as you follow your heart and begin this most amazing journey!

Blessings, Nadene

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Sticking to it

img-20160513-wa0004Some homeschool days are tough and you or your child/ren might want to give up.  I have had to stick at our homeschooling over and over when we have stressed and struggled and wanted to give up. 

May I share a couple of tips to help encourage and motivate you to keep heart and head when things seem difficult and hard ~

  • Pray.   Tell the Lord all about your fears, difficulties and thoughts.  Ask Him for His grace to live in His life.  Ask Him to show you the situation from His perspective. Ask for His wisdom and strength to do the right thing.  I often ask Him what I should do today, and not worry about the years ahead.
  • When about to give up, make a plan. Plan something for the day that everyone enjoys and which creates a bond … such as reading aloud, art, crafts, a nature walk, listening to an audio book, going an outing … whatever it takes to get a fresh perspective.  This flexibility is the true blessing of homeschooling.  When things get really bad, take the day off … have picnic or go swim, or curl up together on the couch with popcorn and a great movie.  Give yourself a day to de-stress and try again the next day.
  • Learning new information is usually stressful.  In the end, it is never about learning information but growing in character and in relationships.  A child can always learn facts, but struggles and difficulties are always personal.  Gently encourage your child in their attitude and choices.  Instill the habits that will build character.
  • Sometimes a child just isn’t ready.  Put the work aside and try again in a few months time.
  • Look for alternatives. Try a physical, practical, hands-on activity, or try learning with jumping or singing.  Let your child record their narrations on a voice note or video instead of writing.  Ask them to act it out or make a model or paint the illustration.  Give your child options and choices.
  • If a textbook or book doesn’t work or isn’t a good fit for you or your child, adapt it.  Abandon it!  Yes.  You have permission to put it away.  Rather find an illustrated magazine or borrow a library book about the subject.  Go online and search out a suitable YouTube playlist and let your child watch educational videos.  They will learn more information with these alternatives, and, more importantly,  they will gain a personal connection with what they have watched or read.
  • Deal with fears in perspective — will this really matter 2 years from now?  If not, don’t sweat the small stuff.  Let it go.  You usually will have time to try again.  Even in high school, we “lost” 2 years on a curriculum that was not working for my middle child.  But she was young, and even now, I am not in a rush to catch up those “missing” years.  We will simply push on with what we have in front of us right now.  Even now, facing her final year, we may have to go on into 2017 instead of trying to finish this year.
  • Look for help.  I joined a few relevant  homeschool Facebook groups that offer great advice and give valuable support and encouragement.  Ask the curriculum provider for help.  Join their forums.  In my first year of homeschooling before Facebook existed, this was marvellous help.  And I needed the wisdom, experience and perspective of older moms who were a few stages ahead of me.
  • Don’t compare your children with others.  This is their life, their story and their song.  No one else determines this.
  • Ban “Should have …” and instead say, “Right now ….”  Don’t waste energy looking back and living with regret. You didn’t plan to fail or destroy your child’s education.  What you didn’t know, you couldn’t do, so let it go and do your best with what you know now.
  • Perseverance is highly valued.  Stick to your decision and keep on course.  You may alter deadlines, reset some destinations, avoid some storms or rapids, but keep going on!  Don’t give up.
  • Try, try and try again.  Try this way or that, but keep going.  You will come through this and it will all be fine.

If we had lived close to a town with good schools, I may have given up many times in these high school years, but God, in His great mercy and grace, has kept me right where He wants me and we have had to stick to it.  I am so grateful!  As I look at my gorgeous, beautiful daughters growing into such amazing young women, I am so thankful that we have had this incredible journey together!  It is all worth it!

Wrapped up in grace, Nadene

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Combine Art & Read Alouds

Here’s this week’s practical tip ~

art-read-alouds

Busy hands with listening ears” has helped my kids focus during read alouds in our homeschooling.  I always planned hands-on activities for each theme so that my kids were quietly and constructively busy while I read aloud to them.  But, while some projects were distracting, drawing, painting and coloring-in activities were very helpful.  20150701_113932

Combining several children on the same core and covering the same Fine Arts is a wonderful way of streamlining and easing your homeschooling!   We used my traced outlines of art masterpieces and painted them for art appreciation lessons and this was a wonderful opportunity for combining art with listening to classical music or our current read aloud.

Many first-time homeschool moms are often overwhelmed by the huge amount of reading they have with their children and fine arts is often neglected.  So, why not plan a simple art activity for each week and let your children quietly create while you read aloud.

Each week try put out new art materials such as oil pastels, or glue and string, or some magazines and scissors, or puffy paints or glitter, so that your kids can experiment and enjoy a variety of art supplies   (Look on my Art Page for many more art appreciation lessons and ideas.)

Often I encouraged my kids to illustrate the characters or current scene in the read aloud.  These gorgeous illustrations often formed part of their narrations.  After the chapter reading, my kids would dictate or write their narrations next to their pictures.  My youngest is a visual learner and could often express her ideas far better in an illustration than with words!

Alternatively, small kiddies can play with playdough, felt boards, stacking, sorting, beading, or threading, while older kids who do not want to draw or paint can do handwork such as knitting, embroidery, hand sewing, or building puzzles, or making models.

Legos were a favorite, but it was sometimes difficult to prevent the noise of sorting through all the blocks and pieces.  I would encourage them to pour out the pieces on a towel and spread them out first before I started to read aloud.  We even used Legos for narrations!

Read Jean Van’t Hul of Artful Parent.com “Why Read Aloud Time is Drawing time“.

Hope this encourages you in your homeschooling!

Blessings, Nadene

 

Practical Tip ~ Textmapping

Here’s this week’s practical tip ~

Text Mapping

Text-mapping is an excellent technique that helps a child to differentiate and identify areas of a text using highlighters.   Textmapping guides the child to circle, underline or draw boxes around sections, headings, text, illustrations, dates and important vocabulary This provides the child with an overview of all the text and reinforces pre-reading skills.

Copied pages of a textbook chapter or relevant pages are pasted together to form one long scroll.

Drawing of a scroll that has been marked with highlighters and colored markers. Shows margin notes and certain key features circled, colored and otherwise marked.
Textmapping color codes
  • Textmapping is excellent for all non-fiction books and textbooks.
  • This method emphasizes pre-reading skills.  They haven’t read the text itself yet, but have navigated the entire article.
  • Textmapping is a very effective tool for special-needs/ remedial students or weak readers as it helps the student identify different areas of the text and isolate smaller sections where they can use pre-reading skills to break down the text.  Colors define specific areas and they can easily isolate a heading with its accompanying passage and ignore the rest of the text.
  • This skill is particularly important for middle schoolers who are suddenly faced with longer chapters or several pages of their books, textbooks.
  • It is also good for high schoolers who need to summarize large sections of information or review work for tests or exams.
  • Textmapping helps students break down into manageable sections to summarize,  or plan, or prepare for projects and presentations.
  • This method is excellent for group work.
  • Textmapping enables teachers to clearly and explicitly model reading comprehension, writing and study skills using a model scroll or on an example on a smartboard.
  • The complete layout of a scroll gives the child an excellent overview ~ great for global learners.
  • Because of its length, the child must move (crawl on the floor or walk along a row of desks) along it, zoom in or out, to interact with the text ~ excellent for kinesthetic learners.
  • Marking is very physical and hands-on ~ wonderful for the tactile learner.
  • The colored markings  are very clear and everything can be seen at a glance ~ fabulous for the visual learner.
  • Scrolls and text mapping provide a better fit with the learning strengths of ADHD individuals ~ helps children who have learning disabilities or attention deficits.

Because this method involves printing out several pages in color, I have adapted the method to work directly in the book and we use colored post-it tabs and colored sticky notes which we map areas and sections without marking expensive books or library books.  I have also experimented with plastic page protectors cut open down one side to slide over a page and we use colored whiteboard markers.

Please read Textmapping.org for textmapping basic and see all the examples in my original post Textmapping.  Download my Text Mapping notes on textmapping.

Read more ~

 

 

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I’ve been Doodelwashed!

This week I have been featured as a guest artist on Doodlewashed.com!

Doodlewash sketches I discovered Doodlewashed on Instagram and loved Charlie O’Shield’s generous and inclusive approach to sharing art with others in his #WorldWatercolorGroup.

So, what exactly is Doodlewashed?  Here’s Charlie’s explanation (emphasis mine) ~

DOODLEWASH – (noun)
doo·dle·wash \ˈ[dü-dəl-wawsh]

  1. Anything one creates that involves a drop of water to create beautiful washes of color and/or ink: I grabbed my brush and made a new doodlewash.

DOODLEWASH – (verb)
doo·dle·wash \ˈ[dü-dəl-wawsh]

  1. To apply water to colors and/or ink for the purpose of creating immense satisfaction: After I finished that sketch, I just had to doodlewash it!

DOODLEWASHER – (noun)
doo·dle·wash·er \ˈ[dü-dəl-waw-sher]

  1. Avid creator and artist who uses water with color and/or ink to make beautiful things
  2. One who can’t resist adding splashes of water to sketches: I sometimes just use pen and ink, but I’m a doodlewasher at heart. 
  3. A super cool person: No way! I didn’t know she was a doodlewasher. That’s so awesome!

DOODLEWASHING – (verb-ing)
doo·dle·wash·ing \ˈ[dü-dəl-waw-shing]

  1. The compulsive need to make something new and then apply water to itI know there’s a new show on TV, but I’d rather be doodlewashing. 

DOODLEWASHED – (adjective)
doo·dle·washed \ˈ[dü-dəl-wawsht]

  1. of, relating to, or characteristic of a person who has become addicted to daily doodlewashing: I can’t imagine stopping now. I’m totally doodlewashed!
  2. The state of being one feels while “in the zone” while creating a doodlewash: It’s been how many hours? Oh my, I was so doodlewashed I didn’t notice.
  3. Having your amazing watercolor art featured on doodlewash.com: Yay! I’ve been doodlewashed!

Synonyms

  1. happy, calm, ecstatic, relaxed, delirious (it’s really your call here)

I took part in his August Adventure “Share Your Favorite Things” and it was a wonderful way to get to learn a little more about each other.   He posted 31 topics for the month and we shared our daily sketches on Instagram’s  #WorldWatercolorGroupNad's Art

Similar to participating in Sketch Tuesday, the simple act of daily sketching and sharing really heightened my creative juices, and I couldn’t wait to doodle and draw daily.

Join  @Doodlewashed September Travel Memories and share in the creative Doodlewashing fun!  doodlewash-september-2016-adventure-prompts

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Multi-potential-ite

A few months ago a good friend recommended a TED talk by  Emilie Wapnick: Why some of us don’t have one true calling.

To quote Emilie,

“A multipotentialite is a person with many interests and creative pursuits.”

Not only did her talk ring bells in my heart for my own feelings … that I have always been a Jack-of-all-Trades-Master-of-None my whole life, but I could see why my own children were not necessarily able to chose a specific career path and embark on dedicated further study.  There are just too many areas of passions and interests to narrow everything down to one focussed study or career.

https://nuatexperiment.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/lego-man_0709_acp-syndication_large.jpg?w=381&h=226Our culture applauds devotion, dedication and specialization.  Our faith believes in having a purpose and a calling.  People easily identify a gifting.  So, in many ways, people look down on multipotentialites as time wasters, under-achievers, immature, or “wasting your talent”.  Others may even ask,  “What’s wrong with him/her?” especially when talking about young adults who are still exploring their options.

There seems to be accepted formula ~

  1. Know what you want to become when you are older  +
  2. Choose the subjects and study course to match this choice +
  3. Specialize +
  4. Graduate with a degree/s +
  5. Find and specific job in the career +
  6. Work in that field = SUCCESS

Many children and young adults feel stressed and insecure that they can’t define exactly what they want to do as a career.  Many homeschool parents feel that they have failed to encourage their multipotentialite child to study or excel in a specific area.   Parents of multipotentialites often wish they could feel secure about their young adult’s future and feel frustrated that their child hasn’t “found themselves” yet.

Very interestingly, Emilie describes 3 “superpower” strengths of multipotenialites ~

  1. Idea Synthesis – combining 2 or more fields and creating something new at the intersection.  Innovation and new ideas happens at the intersection.
  2. Rapid Learning – multipotentialites learn hard when interested,  they are less afraid of trying new things.  She says that it is rarely a waste of time to pursue something you are drawn to, even if you end up quitting, because you might apply that knowledge in a different way from what you anticipated.”
  3. Adaptability – the ability to morph into whatever you need to be in any given situation.   Some employers believe that adaptability is the single most important skill to have to thrive in the 21st century.

Contrary to schools, systems, institutions and “specialist” mentality, homeschooling  provides the perfect environment that allows the multipotentialite child the freedom to embrace their “inner wiring”.

In your homeschooling, encourage your children to be diverse, creative, out-of-the-box thinkers.  Provide opportunities for exploration, diversification and intersection.  Stimulate their curiosity.  Let them be discoverers!

Allow your child to let go of things they are good at to be able to explore other areas or skills.  No matter how gifted or talented your child is, do not make that their label or box, but allow it to develop, change or take a back seat in favour of new and diverse interests.  In the end, everything they have learnt and discovered becomes the fullness of who they are … multi-potential-ite!

Encourage your children (and yourself) to be themselves!

In Grace,  Nadene

Also Read “How to get over multipotentialite guilt and “wasted talent”

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Practical Tip ~ Senior Maths Cheat Sheets

Here’s this week’s practical tip ~

Senior Mini OfficeMost highschool Maths students need to have maths formulas, conversion charts, geometry formulas, number systems, order of operations, and other important Maths information at hand.  We called it a mini office, but some think of these pages as “cheat sheets”.

Over the years, instead of making a laminated file folder mini office, I simply place the pages in a page-protector display file.  We keep the file on hand and my high schoolers use it regularly.

You can find all my free Maths Mini Office downloads here.   Download yours for your highschooler.

Blessings, Nadene

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Have you liked my new Practical Pages Facebook Page yet?

Facebook Practical Pages coverSeveral months ago I started a new Practical Pages FB page because the original FB page could not be merged to my personal account.  Over the months since, only a couple hundred have joined me on my new page.

Would you please click and like the new page so that all my fresh posts automatically come up on your feed?

Blessings, Nadene

 

 

 

Figuring It Out

I need to whisper this …

I’m feeling insecure about highschool homeschooling …Exam stress

I’m trying to figure things out and I do not know quite how, or what or where or when …

I’m feeling unsure, uncertain and ill-equipped.

These moments are written in my homeschooling script, and it often feels awful.  You too, right?

Please ignore all my homeschool posts where you think that I have it all together.  I like to feel organized and in control.  I prefer to be one step ahead and prepared, but instead, I have found homeschooling my high schoolers to be a lot more complex and complicated.

They are complex and complicated at times, especially when they are transitioning through puberty.  Physical and emotional changes cause moods swings and their changed perspective (especially when they realise mom and dad are not perfect and definitely don’t know everything!) causes the simple and normal to shift off-kilter.  They are insecure and withdraw.  They think more and need time and space to mull and ponder.  They need peers and close friends. They need grace.

Homeschool is no longer about fun little unit studies, delight-directed learning or creative days, or reading poetry while lying under trees and or meandering on nature walks and journalling.  Now, academics has become an issue.   Correspondence courses, curriculums, subject choices, aptitude tests and narrowing choices. exams and qualifications all rear their ugly side –pass or fail!  And what about the question of what is the best option for their future?

Right now, our struggle is an online high school course that doesn’t “teach” the way my teen learns and she’s struggling every day and especially during her tests … and I can’t actually help her.  Yikes!  She’s frustrated, angry and afraid.  I’m frustrated, angry and afraid.  Not a good mix for serene homeschooling!  She hates failing some of her tests and she often feels unmotivated and depressed.  And while this is front-and-centre of our homeschooling, there are larger uncertainties that lurk behind the exams and passing or failing.  What next in her life?

I’m trying to figure it out!

And no one really and truly prepared me for this complexity of this phase.

There must be a formula, right?

Well, here’s a truth — I will have to figure out what each child needs at each age and stage.  Each child is different and we will have to navigate their academic and career choices and options.

There is no “right way” except to pray and ask the Lord for His wisdom and His purpose for each child.  I need to pray that I find grace to let my children become who they are meant to be and help guide them to fulfill their giftings and calling.  How can I best encourage their character growth before I stress about their qualifications and careers?  Matric (high school graduation) is just a stepping stone to their next stage.  What is my teen’s best options for further study or growth?

Each person is unique.  Everyone deserves to develop, to change, to start over.  I’m just figuring it out … and praying and trusting for God’s grace …

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Practical Tip ~ Rolodex

Here’s this week’s practical tip ~  (Revisiting my organization archives)

Rolodex

Years ago I bought an amazing organization book called Confessions of an Organized Homemaker by Deniece Schofield  (ISBN 1-55870-361-6) where she recommends filing recipes on a Rolodex.  I started mine too, way back in 2000.

Advantages of the Rolodex Recipe System ~

  • Easy to file and organize
  • Rolodex file is compact and doesn’t take up valuable counter top space
  • Recipe is visible; just press open at the card you need
  • When several people bake or cook at the same time, we each take our recipe card out and place it at our work station
  • Add new recipe cards  – quick and simple
  • New recipes are put up on the fridge.  If you haven’t cooked or baked it in 10 days – toss it out!  A great motivator!  If it works – simply file it.
  • The Rolodex holds stacks and stacks of recipes
  • Keep blank cards in your handbag to jot new recipes when waiting or visiting friends
  • In recent years I have added my Trim Healthy Mama and Low Carb recipes on yellow cards so that they stand out from my older, conventional recipes.

Some negatives ~

  • It seems a schlep to rewrite recipes, but I sat for a few hours each evening many years ago and wrote out my favorite recipes.  Now I sit with my blank cards when I read a new cookbook, and quickly jot down the new recipe and give it a try!
  • Because the cards are small, I abbreviate the recipe, especially the method.  This was fine until my younger kids started to cook and bake.  I simply rewrote some cards, and with experience and one-on-one training they master the abbreviated recipes.
  • Some cards have become smudged – use a waterproof pen!

How did I file my recipes?  I added colored stickers and labels to cards to separate the different groups.

  • A = conversions & substitutes
  • B = Biscuits, Breads, Baking ~ Crumpets, Dumplings, Muffins, Rusks, Scones
  • C = Cakes
  • D = Desserts, Dairy
  • E = Egg dishes
  • F = Fish
  • H = Herbs
  • J = Juicing, Jams, Jewish cooking
  • L = Lunches
  • M = Meat ~ Chicken, Lamb, Mince, Meat casseroles,
  • O = Other ~ play dough, salt dough, bath salts, bubbles, homemade soaps, dog food etc.
  • P = Pasta, Pastry, Pancakes, Pies
  • Q = Quiche & tarts
  • R = Rice
  • S = Salads, Sauces, Soups, Sweets
  • T = Tuna
  • V = Vegetables
  • W = Washing soap, laundry soaps

Nowadays everything is online, electronic, super-technical, Internet-based.  Many moms swear by their Kindles and iPad for their recipes. There are also amazing websites for menu planning and online recipe storage, but my Rolodex Recipe system serves me well and I don’t need to recharge it!

This system could work for other subjects too.  What about using a Rolodex instead of an index box for Scripture Memorization?

Happy organizing!  Blessings, Nadene

 

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