Teaching Afrikaans phonics with “Alfabet Pret!”

Looking for a fun way to teach your child their Afrikaans phonetic alphabet?

Op soek na ‘n prettige manier om u kind sy Afrikaanse fonetiese alfabet te leer?

I have created Alfabet Pret!alphabet cards with the correct Afrikaans phonetic clues inside each letter shape.  These picture clues help your child recognize the phonetic sound of each letter and this helps him/her to learn to read easily.  Included in the download are fun activities and games that your child can use to learn to recognize their letter sounds and then use to start to build words.  To purchase this quality phonics download, please place an order on my Packages page.

Ek het Alfabet Pret! alfabetkaarte met die korrekte Afrikaanse fonetiese leidraad in elke lettervorm geskep.  Die prentjies binne-in elke letter help u kind om die fonetiese kank van die letter te identifiseer.  Dit maak dit dan vir jou kind maklik om te leer lees.  Instruksies vir prettige aktiwiteite en speletjies waar jou kind die alfabet kaartjies gebruik om die letterklanke te oefen  en om woorde begin te bou, is in die aflaai .  Plaas  aseblief jou bestelling op my Packages bladsy om hierdie kwaliteit aflaai  te koop.

How to teach the phonetic alphabet using “Alfabet Pret!” ~

  1. Present a letter to your child and ask what picture they can recognize inside the letter shape.
  2. Say the sound of the picture and then the name of the picture like ~ “a” as in “apple”, “b” as in “ball”.
  3. Use only the phonetic sounds of the alphabet and do not say the official name of the alphabet, such as the sound “a” not “ay” and the sound “ba” not “bee”.
  4. Repeat the phonetic sound of the letter and its picture again and ask your child to repeat the letter sound and the name of the picture.
  5. Teach only one or two letters in a lesson, maybe a row of letters at a time.
  6. Revise the previous lesson’s letters and then add a few new letters each lesson until your child knows the whole alphabet.

Print and laminate the 3 pages of the phonic letters and print, cut out and laminate 2 sets of the phonic cards for the activities and games.

Hoe om die fonetiese alfabet aan u kind te leer

  1. Wys ‘n letter vir jou kind en vra hom/haar watter prentjie hy/sy in die letter kan sien.
  2. Sê eers die klank van die letter en dan die prentjie wat met daardie klank begin. Bv. “a vir appel” en “b vir bal”.
  3. Gebruik die fonetiese klank vir die letter en nie die amptelike alfabet-naam van die klank nie. Met ander woorde gebruik “ô” en nie “oo” nie, of die klank “mm” en nie die naam “em” nie.
  4. Herhaal dit en vra dan u kind om die klank en prentjienaam agter u aan te sê.
  5. Doen slegs een of twee letters, of dalk ‘n ry, op ‘n slag.
  6. Hersien elke keer die vorige les se letters, voordat u voortgaan met een of twee nuwe letters in die volgende les. Gaan so voort todat u kind die hele alfabet ken.

Druk en lamineer die 3 bladsye van die letterklanke en druk, knip uit en lamineer 2 stelle kaartjies vir die aktiwiteite en speletjies.

The individual cards are perfect for playing games! Playing fun games such as “Snap!”, “Bingo!” or “Memory” is a wonderful and effective way to practice recognizing and learning the alphabet.

Die individuele kaarte is perfek om speletjies mee te speel.  Speletjies soos “Snap!”, “Bingo!” en “Lotto!” is ‘n wonderlike en effektiewe manier om die herkenning van die klanke en letters in te oefen.

Whether your child is learning to read in their mother language or learning a 2nd language, Alfabet Pret! is a fabulous fun way to teach them their phonic alphabet!

Of u kind in hul moedertaal leer lees of ‘n 2de taal aanleer, is Alfabet Pret!‘n wonderlike prettige manier om hulle hul fonetiese alfabet te leer!

Please pop over to my Packages page to order this amazing, quality phonics download!

Plaas  aseblief jou bestelling op my Packages bladsy om hierdie kwaliteit aflaai  te koop.

Blessings, Nadene

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PS. Afrikaans is one of South African’s 11 official languages, the third most spoken language, with its roots from the Dutch language which evolved when Dutch settlers settled in the Cape in the 18th Century.

Afrikaans is een van Suid-Afrika se 11 amptelike tale, die derde mees gesproke taal, met sy oorsprong uit die Nederlandse taal wat ontwikkel het toe Nederlandse setlaars hulle in die 18de eeu in die Kaap gevestig het.

Find Your Fit

Recently I shared some ideas on how to Tailor-make your curriculum.  Just as when you buy your children’s clothes, you may sometime need to try a size smaller or larger to get the best fit, so, too, it is with finding the right fit for your child’s homeschool curriculum.

Your child’s age is often a starting point, however your child may need to begin at an earlier grade, or stay on a level longer than the professional calculated for the average child. Your child may need to skip over a grade where he finds work too easy in order that he finds the level that stimulates and challenges him.

This individualization should be the practice in every classroom, but the school system usually focuses on the average child and so the more gifted or special-needs child often fall through the cracks.  Because homeschooling is a one-on-one education, it is far easier for a parent to find the perfect fit for their child.

You are tailor-making your child’s learning experience – read more Tailor made and Offer a learning buffet  and Tailor-make your curriculum.

I urge you to customize your curriculum and subjects for each child.

Some of the most challenging subjects that require individualization are
Reading, Writing and Maths.  This post has quite a few links to my archives.  Please bookmark them to read later if you don’t have time today.)

Reading

  • Teach your child their phonics so that they know how to sound out every letter in the alphabet and then combination letters called blends.
  • Use flashcards, charts and picture games to practice and master phonics.
  • Find a series of early readers that are both entertaining and interesting and which contain almost all the words your child can sound out and read.
  • Use partnered reading where your child sits on your lap are next to you, and you whisper in their ear as they read and sound out their words.  You can see that we use a ruler or pointer to help with tracking along the sentence.
  • Read more about partnered reading technique I used with my youngest child — Partnered Reading Helps Improve Reading and Partnered Reading ~ moments I treasure and Slow learner Joys discovered.

Writing 

  • Don’t fret/ push/ demand/ panic if your child isn’t ready to write out his own narrations / or write neatly.
  • Keep on assisting him and encourage oral dictations, recorded narrations or dictated narrations, or traced over or printed dictated narrations. The vital skill of narration is being practiced and the writing will come later.  Read about being your child’s Narration Scribe
  • Gently encourage your child to write an opening sentence and then the concluding sentence. Work on developing 3 sentences that form a paragraph.  Before long he will be doing more and more of his own written narrations.
  • Use a word bank  or textmapping to help your child remember their ideas.
  • Find an alternative activity that your child enjoys instead of the prescribed narration – there are so many options and alternatives!  Purchase my Narration Ideas booklet with over 100 ideas and options instead of just writing!
  • Writing is such an important skill that you should find a way for your child to present his thoughts and understanding with narrations because Narrations show you what he knows.

Mathematics

  • Mathematics is a very important subject and it is vital to find the right level and pace and approach for each child.
  • Swap or add another Maths book if the course your child uses progresses too quickly.  Look for an exercise or book that offers more practice lessons, or one that provides more visual or practical work.
  • Use concrete apparatus for as long as is needed.  Work with beads, blocks, number lines, counting fingers or whatever helps your child.  It really doesn’t actually matter how long your child needs these “props”.  If it helps, then use them!  Don’t shame your child or let him believe that he is immature.  Make physical apparatus options available.
  • Gently encourage your child to do the same activity again without the physical apparatus and teach him how to picture the blocks or bead in his head.  It may just suddenly ‘click’ and he will be able to continue his work without the objects.
  • Maths butterfliesEncourage Maths drills with games and mental Maths worksheets.
  •  Use different approaches as and when needed, for example, use blocks, flashcards, use number lines, and or computer games to teach, practice and master a concept.
  • Work for mastery — you want your child to feel a sense of confidence.  Maths is a very emotionally charged subject for some children.  Don’t give up at a point of anxiety or stress.  Look for creative ways of doing the work so that your child feels good about themselves.

Time

  • Start by stretching out a one-year curriculum over 18 months to provide a wide margin of time to enjoy themes and topics that your children enjoy, time to take detours or take longer scenic stops.
  • Continue working longer on any concepts to practice and fully master a skill.
  • Read about my experiences extending time on a curriculum — Re-using Sonlight and doing it differently and Best Homeschooling Decision-More Time .

In every subject, in every grade, adjust your course to suit your child’s interests, ability and pace.  Try find the balance between challenging and mastery, gently increasing the work load and difficulty, but allowing for their sense of “I can do it!”

Blessings as you find your fit, Nadene

 

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Reader’s Question ~ Hold back on Phonics?

I really enjoy receiving your emails and comments!
Your thanks have blessed me.
I am so grateful to be able to blog posts of encouragement and inspiration here.
Some homeschool moms write to me looking for some advice or to confirm their choices.
Knowing that others face similar fears, challenges and questions, I want to humbly submit my reply.
Recently a reader emailed me with this question ~
“I have held back with teaching phonics and handwriting because my son who turns 6 in May has not enjoyed any workbooks and shuts down when I start talking about sounds.  I love your idea of laminated handwriting charts and I think this will be a better fit for him than workbooks. What do you think?” 
 And I replied ~
I think that your heart confirms what you are doing!
  • Follow your heart and trust your instincts.  
  • When your child is not ready, it is very good to hold back from formal workbooks and lessons.
  • Young children often need more physical, gross-motor development before doing fine-motor skills required in handwriting.  Pop over to my post “Fine Handwriting Needs Fine Muscles” for games and activity ideas.
  • Don’t force any subject or skill, but simply wait for your child to show signs of readiness. Kids that pretend to write generally are ready to learn to write.
  • Even a slow child  catches up and excels when they are ready, eager and enthusiastic.
  • Continue with the stuff they enjoy.
  • Don’t sigh with disappointed or make any sign of your frustration.  Simply pack the workbook away and find something else that is interesting and fun!
  • Every 3 months or so, try again.  Some kids never take to some approaches and you may have to be creative and do some Internet browsing for ideas.
  • Please don’t spend money on fancy workbooks or full curriculum packages, especially those that promote those with all those “bells and whistles“.  They are often expensive and will not necessarily make your child enjoy his lessons any more.
  • Read Ruth Beechick’s little books on Reading, Language and Maths!  Her advice is sound and excellent and her lessons are simple and highly practical.
  • Teaching handwriting with my laminated handwriting charts is really effective!
  • It is my genuine experience after 15 years+ of homeschooling, that short, sweet lessons work!
 Hope that this advice helps you!  What would you suggest to this reader?  Please share in the comments below
Blessings,