Letter 4 – Toddlers

Letter to myselfHere’s the next letter my series ~ “Letter To Mewhere I share the letters I wrote to myself, encouraging myself (and, hopefully, other new homeschoolers)  with what I wish I had known when I started out on our homeschooling journey ~

 Dear Nadene,

So you’re starting homeschool with your toddlers.  You do not need to “do formal school” with your littles.  Forget the boxed curriculums, those expensive educational toys and the dedicated time and place for learning.  It IS NOT NECESSARY!  Life and learning go hand-in-hand.  Sorting laundry, plumping pillows, washing veggies, and any and every activity you are busy with are all part of the lessons learnt at this stage.

P1040645Play!  Go outside.  Explore!  A sandbox and some water are your toddler’s best toys!  Let her get dirty, play in puddles, smear mud, eat some worms … it is good, old-fashioned, messy fun!  Blow bubbles, chase butterflies and sniff all the flowers. Kick balls and throw bean bags.  Have fun!

Sing songs.  Sing them over and over again.  Do hand actions!  Dance and move.  Play musical instruments; like those you make with some seeds in bottles, two sticks to beat together, a few bells on some string. Buy a few good CDs and play them during the day and in the car.  This is the season when the “wheels of the bus go round and round ….”

P1100408Read to your toddler.  A good Mother Goose or Classic Children’s Storybook with lovely illustrations is all you need.  Read with funny expressions!  You’ll make the story come alive!  Read every day.  Read at night at bedtime.  Read alouds are the most powerful learning tool you will ever, ever need!  Your children will amaze you with an ever-increasing vocabulary, creative imagination and incredible general knowledge! Sit with your child on your lap and cuddle together. This is going to become her and your most cherished memory of homeschooling!  And DON”T STOP!   Read aloud to your teens!  They will still love it!

Encourage narrations after the story … “tell me the story in your own words”  or “what happened to the mouse?”  or draw a picture of the story.  Use a large blank jotter and write your child’s dictated narration under or near their illustration.  It will be her precious book of creative learning.

Playing with playdoughTeach basic skills with fun games.  Select one or two short activities per day — roll and cut playdough, sort colors and shapes, pour rice, beans or water through funnels and into jugs, paste magazine pictures or wool or cotton wool onto card, peg with clothes pegs, press stubby pins in holes, cut paper with safety scissors, draw with chubby crayons, finger paint, lace with reels, thread large beads … the lists are endless.  Just one or two activities per day!  That’s all.  Prepare for repetition.  Kids love to repeat an activity over and over. It is their way of mastery.  Go with them until they have had enough and then move on to something new.

Make Ziplock activity bags for your toddlers if you are teaching older kiddies.  They will save your sanity when you need to focus on your older children!  Use some of the ideas above, as well as countless others you’ll find on Pinterest and Google.  Spend an hour or two once a month and create new sets.   Swap them with your friends or make them for each other.  Teach your toddler to play quietly and then pack all the pieces back in the bag before going on to another activity.  These are also great for church and waiting rooms!

Avoid over-scheduling your toddler!  She only needs some swim safety lessons, but don’t fill her days with endless extra lessons.  She does not need horse riding, kinder music, group play dates, ballet, ball skills sessions that require you to pack up and bundle everyone in the car and stress to arrive in time … only to arrive home late with tired, ratty kids and still have supper to prepare … Your toddler will not fall behind.  You are not neglecting her if you don’t fall into this modern-day trend.

Follow your child’s readiness.  Take note of the things she enjoys and facilitates her love to learn gently. You may lead her to something further, but don’t rush her.   And if she is not ready for something, just quietly put it aside and try again a few months later.

Prepare your child ahead of events so she can cope with change or new things.  Give 5 minutes “heads up” before the game or activity ends so that she can move on without tantrums.  Explain your expectations clearly and simply, for example:  “When we are in the shop we are not buying any (….) (sweets or drinks) at the till.  Here are your sippy cup and teddy to hold while we shop.”  Remind her again as you put your toddler in the trolley.  Be kind and gentle but firm. 

And how to avoid birthday party meltdowns?  Use the golden ratio = child’s age: the number of friends + 1, so, if your child is turning 2, then she can cope with 3 friends.    Arrange to have healthy party foods or snacks with your friends and agree not to give away sweets as party favours. 

Lastly, Nadene, this will all be over in such a short time!  Love every moment of every age and stage.  All too soon they will grow up and move on with their lives.  Homeschooling your children is the most precious gift!

Blessings from your older, hopefully, wiser self,

Nadene

PS.  I did get little teary posting photos of my youngest daughter, Lara, then 5 years old, who is now a tall, slender 13-year-young lady … sigh … and recall those precious young years.

I’d love to hear your views and thoughts on this topic!  Please, would you share yours in the comments?

Previous posts in this series:

Use Comics To Teach Direct Speech

We had such fun creating dynamic comic strip stories for our Solar System studies.

Solar System Jupiter 002Because comics convey loads of information and visual detail, they are a wonderful resource for language arts and creative writing activities.

Most the comics include dialogue written in speech bubbles.

This led to a fabulous LA lesson on writing direct speech ~

We used our literature read aloud books to find examples of direct speech and together formulated our simple direct speech rules.

  • Write down the spoken words or dialogue that appear in speech bubbles exactly  as they appear, but inside inverted commas.
  • Use inverted commas or quotation marks “…”  immediately before and after the spoken words.
  • Insert punctuation marks that suit the dialogue after the dialogue inside the inverted commas.
  • Use capital letters to start any dialogue, or any new dialogue that follows a full stop.
  • Question marks  & exclamation marks act as a full stop.
  • Use an appropriate attribution for each speaker and try be creative and vary using the word “said”.
  • Separate dialogue from the attribution with a comma.
  • ALWAYS skip a line and start a new line for a new speaker.

Then we took a block from the comic with speech bubbles and discussed and wrote out the direct speech on our white board.  My daughter loves to be dramatic, and so she instantly used a variety of words other than “said”, but you may want to discuss other more creative words.  We looked through this list ~

RIP said is dead

Comic blocks with a lot of visual information needs to be described in words. Adding this to the direct speech, and conveying a flow of action, thought and interest to the written dialogue is a more advanced skill. The more advanced student will automatically interpret and describe the comic strip blocks to make a wonderful, interesting story.

Here is an extract of Lara’s direct speech based on the comic strip above ~

Direct Speech example

My daughter was so enthusiastic and was really proud of her first effort!

When typing the direct speech on the computer, she reinforced her typing skills as well as the technical aspects of the written direct speech.  When she had completed her first draft, I noticed that she hadn’t left a line open between different speakers.  When typing, she needed to press ‘enter’ + ‘enter’ again to leave a line open and begin on a new line.

Normally we use our literature books and copywork or dictations for all our language arts, but this approach was fresh, personal and exciting!  Using a previous lesson that was very successful and fun,  really motivated the content of this lesson and it worked brilliantly!

Blessings,

Print Handwriting Tip #1

At the end of 2013 my top 5 Practical Pages posts for the year were:

It seems that most readers search for handwriting tips and Google leads them here!  With this in mind, I thought I would share some practical handwriting tips.

Some important free handwriting downloads:

Tip #1

Teach Large Letters Before Small

Handwriting is a fine motor activity.  Young children need to be able to control large movements before they can control fine movements. Start your lessons with really big shapes before taking up a pencil and writing on paper.

Some simple physical pre-writing activities: Make sure you have a clear, large handwriting chart available ~ download your free charts: Print Handwriting Charts:

  • Ask your child to form letter shapes using ropes, hula hoops and rods on the ground.
  • Let your children form the letter shape while lying on the ground using a hula hoop or skipping rope.
  • Get 2 or more children to form letter shapes while standing up or lying down.  This is a fun, physical exercise!
  • Draw letters and shapes large in the air.  Kids love to use pool noodles and make the letters huge!
  • Draw letters in sand with a stick – outside in the sandbox, or inside on a sand table, or on a baking tray with sand/ flour/ rice and a stick or drinking straw.
  • Draw letters on glass windows in shaving cream. This is FUN!  Let them first cover the window and smear the shaving cream, then do the writing activity, then wipe it off with a towel.
  • Draw white board markers on a big white board.  Use thick markers on a large board before using a thinner marker on a smaller board.

Use clear, descriptive auditory commands for these exercises:

  • Use the words up, down, left, right
  • Make sure the shapes just touch, cross through, reach down, curl around, curl under
  • Use words such as first …, then …, now …
  • Use descriptive comparisons such as as round as a ball, as tall as 2 balls stacked on top, curled like an umbrella handle, hanging like a happy monkey on a branch, like a top hat on a head
  • Make very WIDE lines on blank paper. Divide a jotter page into half lengthways and divide into 3rds across.  Now use each block to draw the letter/ shape so it touches top, sides and bottom of each block.
  • Fold blank paper into quarters and mark the lines. Teach patterns on these wide lines.
  • Next use 17mm lined books (order yours at your local stationery shop)

 

Use a picture reminder in the margin:

  • Use 3 lines for each letter –draw a “man” or a cat in the margin with a circle touching the top and bottom of the head lines, the body in the body line and legs or a tail in the tail line.  In all your lessons refer to where each shape or letter starts, touches, and ends.
  • After sufficient practice and mastery, your child can graduate to ordinary feint and margin lined pages, still using 3 lines for each letter. Draw a man/ cat in the margin as above.
  • Finally, towards 3rd grade, you can use Irish lined paper (these are the narrow lined pages) for written work, still using 3 lines for each letter. To save time, teach your child to draw a dot for the head (●) and a dash (/) for the body and blank for the legs in the margin.

Hope these tips help!

Blessings as you teach your children to write! Please share or ask questions in the comments below.

Much grace,

What Works! Learning Language Arts

What Works! 

Once again I want to share what works when you use Charlotte Mason’s principles. In the more than 14 years of homeschooling until graduation my children have learnt the nuts and bolts of English grammar and language with copywork and dictations.

Dictations and copywork  = effective Language Arts lessons

Ruth Beechick’s “A Strong Start in Language” is perhaps the best book on how to teach language!

She explains the powerful and natural method of how to use reading and writing to teach a child language and grammar.

I highly recommend her book because she gives loads of basic examples, lays out all the suggested grade levels and makes simple and easy-to-apply suggestions.  With this book in hand, you can create all your children’s language arts lessons!

In essence, you will use these skills to teach writing, from forming a child’s name to writing an essay ~

copy, dictate, compare and repeat

Children are tutored through a natural writing process to learn language in the same way that Benjamin Franklin’s taught himself.  Instead of using textbooks and exercises with isolated parts of language and innumerable technical aspects, copywork and dictation leads from the whole-to-the-part.

What is the whole?

It is any meaningful piece of language or passage of writing. 

Writing in its natural setting.

From the passage, language is learnt in context.  They learn to identify the grammar basics and learn the mechanics just by reading and copying the extract.

Even if your child just copies a sentence or paragraph, and spends some time examining and identifying its nuts and bolts such as punctuation, capitalization, parts of speech, they will naturally learn language arts.

What is more fascinating is that they will naturally find these same mechanics during their read alouds.  As I read aloud my young kids call out, “There’s a compound word!” or “That’s a simile!”  Almost every week my kids would eagerly wait for “their” dictation paragraph to be read aloud in our chapter readings.

And may I share a secret?

I haven’t even done the “proper” Charlotte Mason dictations … the ones where the child writes the passage from memory, without copying.  Nope. Not once.  Not even my high schoolers.  We have tried it, but somehow we never arrived at that level.  Instead of feeling defeated, I simply carried on with what we found worked and we all coped with, and it was enough!

Also, even as an English teacher, I worked with a year plan, but never “did it all“.  Homeschool moms, you will have gaps.  Just breathe and let it go.  You will not cover everything.  Not even if you use textbooks and brilliant bells-and-whistles programs.  Use the grade levels as a guide line and trust that you cover most of the aspects as you go along.

But daily dictation lessons on their own will give your child a strong foundation to language arts and creative writing!

Here’s an example  of dictation lessons for a third grade child up ~

  1. Select a passage from a “real/ living” book, a verse from the Bible, a well-known nursery rhyme.
  2. Let your child copy it carefully.  Very young kids start by tracing over the neat, large print.
  3. Next lesson, ask your child to print it out as you read or spell the words for him.
  4. Lastly, he should print the passage without looking at the selection.

For Language Arts ask questions from the same dictation passage ~

  • ask your child to find the full stops
  • find the capital letters, why are they there?
  • which word rhymes with …?
  • circle all the quotation marks
  • tick all the commas
  • why are the exclamation mark used?
  • who is the first sentence about? (this is called the subject)
  • underline the action words or verbs (what the subject is doing is called the predicate)
  • can you find a compound word (a word made up of 2 words)
  • draw a squiggly line under the shortest/ longest sentence
  • draw slashes through the word with 4 syllables (sound parts a word can be broken into)
  • draw a box around all the question words and draw an arrow from this word to the question mark at the end of the sentence

So, here’s an example from an easy Bible verse:

I love the Lord. (Psalm 116:1)

A young child can first trace, then copy, then write out this verse.  Each day he writes the same verse, finally writing it out on his own from slow, assisted dictation.  At the end of the week, ask the child to study it and write it from memory. Encourage him to compare and correct his own work  This will help him learn from any mistakes.   For Language Arts, simply reinforce the grammar rule: Every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a full stop.  Can you find another capital letter?  This is a name.  All names are written with a capital letter and we call these words “proper nouns“.  And there you have it ~ 10 minute Dictation and Language Art lessons ~ short, simple and effective!

Let’s look at a nursery rhyme:

Lucy Locket 

Lucy Locket lost her pocket,

Kitty Fisher found it;

Nothing in it, nothing in it,

But the binding round it.

(from Mother Goose)

I look for the obvious grammar lessons in this rhyme, for example:

  • Circle all the capital letters.
  • Tick those capital letters that are people’s names.  These are proper nouns. A simple lesson.
  • Which 2 words rhyme in the first sentence?
  • Draw a box around a word that ends 3 sentences.  Can you find the 4th one?
  • Can you find all the commas?  There is a special comma with a dot above it.  Circle this punctuation mark.  It is called a semi-colon.  Why do you think it is used?  Look for examples in other nursery rhymes and try deduce the reason for a semi-colon.  Suggest that the child looks for this punctuation mark in the week’s readings.

Our weekly Dictation and Language Arts Lessons:

  • Monday = copy passage (10 minutes max)
  • Tuesday = copy passage & do language arts questions (10 – 15 minutes)
  • Wednesday = copy passage as assisted dictation (10 minutes)
  • Thursday = write out memorized dictation and do language arts questions (10 – 15 minutes)
  • Friday = free day (we normally only do our spelling test, but if needs be, we add the dictation)

P1070277

Often I use the copywork lesson to teach and practice handwriting.  Because the child must write slowly and clearly, this is the one lesson where I emphasize and encourage neat handwriting.

My young kids do their copywork with their laminated handwriting chart propped up in front of them.

I sneak mistakes that I notice in my children’s narrations into my language arts lessons.  This way they learn the mechanics from an “expert” author and apply it to their own written work.  I almost NEVER mention grammar when I mark my children’s narrations, because I want to encourage them to capture their thoughts and ideas.  But, here, analysing someone else’s work, we can tear it apart and pull it back together in a very objective way.

Finally, let me emphasize – keep it short & sweet!  Do language arts as fun and discovery!  My kids called our LA lessons “squiggles and circles” because I asked them to underline with a wiggly line and draw circles.  This kept the lessons short. Most the LA lesson is oral; with simple discussions.  There is very little writing and no tedious exercises.  Note, discuss and move on.

Here are some other copywork & dictation posts:

Once again, I encourage moms to share and ask their questions in the comments below as we discuss “What Works!”

Edited notes: In the years where I used Sonlight, I have bought Sonlight’s Language Arts programs which accompany their reading programs in which Ruth Beechick’s approach and principles are very effectively used.

Blessings,

Ruth Beechick’s books:

  • An Easy Start In Reading  ISBN 0-940319-00-4
  • An Easy Start In Language  ISBN 0-940319-02-0
  • An Easy Start In Arithmetic  ISBN 0-940319-01-2

Highlight Main Ideas

My middle-schooler is learning to write her own notes.

From simple oral narrations, where she “retells” the details of something I read to her,

she now must read her own notes

highlight the main ideas

use those key words or phrases

in her own sentences.

Tough stuff for a 10-year-old!

So we start with baby steps:

I break it down into skills she can manage and build it from there. 🙂

Using the Table of Contents to find the relevant information

  1. Read the notes together.  I sometimes just whisper the words near her ear as I do in partnered reading.
    (Some children need to “see the big picture” first, so a good read through helps them understand the basic flow of ideas.  But if your child is chomping at the bit, and raring to get to work, start straight away with the next point.)
  2. Highlight the main ideas in each sentence.  It may be just 1 word, or a phrase, or a word here and there.
    Again, help your child with this vital skill.  Do it together.  Sometimes I try “trick” my child with a silly concept and say, “Do your think this … is important?”  She’ll giggle, look carefully and chose a more important word.
  3. Use these key words in their own sentences.  Start this skill orally.  Encourage your child to read the highlighted words from 1 sentence aloud and then put them together into a new, simple sentence, similar to the original sentence.  Perhaps change the word order around.  Start with a highlighted word and let your child finish the sentence.  This way, they learn how convey the original concepts, but use their own words.  A vital skill!  Instruct them at the very beginning that they should not copy the original text.

    Write simple sentences using the highlighted words

  4. Write down the ideas.  Again, I encourage you to “help” your emerging writer.  Perhaps you could write the first sentence down as your child dictates to you.  Make them feel important and say, “Tell me what you want to say.”  You could write it directly on their page and then work is done.  Then, the next time, write their dictated sentence out on a white board and ask you child to neatly copy it in their notebook or lapbook page.  Finally, ask  them to write the sentences on their own after an oral practice.

Writing sentences in a minibook

It takes a few stages, but soon your child will master several important skills!

It will happen.

Your child will learn to write their own notes.

How have you helped your child find key words, identify important facts or re-write these facts on their own? Please share with us in the comments.

For your information: In these photos, my child is completing a Footprints in our Land “The Dutch at the Cape” lapbook – of part a wonderful South African literature-based history curriculum.

Blessings,

Narrations 103 Puppets

This is number 3 in my series of Narration posts. (Read the previous posts Jot & Draw and Type & Print)

Many young children love to tell their narrations!

What better way to dynamically retell the story than with

Puppets!

Some of our best puppet shows were spontaneous –

Finger Puppets

The children simply drew outline pictures of the characters from the story.

They stuck a strip of paper to the back of the picture,

wound the paper strip around the finger and taped it closed,

and narrated the story.

Children with a flair for the dramatic include accents and actions.

They swap finger puppets to narrate different characters.

Folded flat, the children pasted their finger puppets on their notebook pages.

Paper Puppets

Our free Aesop lapbook came with paper puppets.

My youngest enjoyed hours of free play with her puppets.

P1070759

Paper Doll/ Men Puppets

During our Sonlight World History studies we created our paper doll series.

These paper dolls were fun to use in narrations.

Laminated and stiff, the children played out their narrations and stories.

But you could paste the paper doll on a wooden stick and make “proper” puppets!

They provide hours of creativity – coloring in,cutting out, pasting clothing and narrating.

We store ours in clear plastic zipper bags.

Hand Puppets

Our hand puppets have been enormously popular

and have lasted for years!

We made our fist puppet show

Esther Play for Purim

with puppets, backdrops,
props and a full script.

A few years later we updated our puppets,

made new backdrops,

added some animal puppets on sticks

for our new play ~

Nativity Puppet Play

Whether simple and quick,

planned and prepared,

practised or spontaneous,

puppets take centre stage.

They divert attention away from the child

and give the child something to “do” while narrating.

Allow your child the freedom to express their narration in a way that is not always dictated or written.

Try puppets!

Blessings,

Narrations 102 Type & Print

In my previous post I shared some practical ways to be your child’s narration scribe.

In this post I would like to give some tips on typing and printing out your child’s narrations.

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Just Type it ~

  • Sit at the computer, open a new Word page and start to type as they narrate.
  • As. Is.
  • Your aim to capture your child’s flow of thought.
  • Don’t worry about any technicalities … yet.
  • Resist the temptation to correct/ prompt/ re-word anything.
  • Don’t worry about mistakes. (I almost never talk about grammar or language use while doing narrations.)
  • If the child stalls or is taking too long to start, you could ask a simple question, “What is the most exciting part?” or “How did …?” or “If you look at the illustration tell me about the story …”
  • Paragraph where necessary.
  • When they have finished, add their story title, and under that, their name and the date.
  • Read it back.  If you read it as they dictated.  If there is some issue such as each. and. every sentence starting, “And then …” “And then …” they will pick up the repetition and you can encourage them to leave out the “And then …” and start the sentence directly.
  • Ask them if they would like to add, or change, or remove anything.
  • If they are happy, save it.
  • Done.

Now for some computer stuff ~

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  • Once the narration is ‘captured’ save it.  Create a folder for each child with their name.  Add sub-folders for specific subjects in their folder, (e.g.: Nadene — History)
  • Select the page layout ~ Portrait (standing up tall and narrow) or landscape (lying wide and flat)
  • Enlarge the title and underline or bold it.
  • Let them choose an interesting or suitable font and font color.
  • Enlarge the font to about 26 (large) so that they can “read” their own narration once it is printed.  Most young children merely ‘retell’ their original story, but this becomes an excellent early reading exercise!
  • Insert photos, clipart or images into the narration where necessary.
  • If the story is long enough, add page numbers.
  • Print out the page.  Punch holes and put it in a binder or cut it out and paste it in their jotter, or on the notebook page, or above or below their illustration.

Print the story out as a A5 booklet~

  • Save the story.
  • Now you will need to make a few layout changes to create a booklet:
    • Select suitable sections (usually after each paragraph) and click ‘insert’ – select ‘page breaks‘ to separate the writing on to a new page. Now there will be a large blank space under the sentence/ paragraph for the child’s illustrations. I try to have an even number of pages, but this is not necessary.
    • ‘Insert -page number’ – select ‘page number‘ and choose if you want the number at the top or bottom of the page, left, right or in the middle of each page.
    • Select all and change to a large font size (about 22 – 26) because you will print 2 pages on a page and it will ‘shrink’ the writing
    • Save the new layout.

Now to print ~

  • Select ‘print’ and on the print page menu look for ‘print 1 page per sheet’ and change it to ‘print 2 pages per sheet‘.
  • See how it looks on the ‘print preview’.
  • Make sure that the font is large enough.  If it is too small, cancel the print job and go back and select all and increase the font size.
  • If you are satisfied – print it out.
  • Fold the pages in half or cut them out to make a booklet. Staple.
  • Let the child illustrate on the blank pages/ spaces.
  • Ask the child to make and/or decorate a cover.

My children loved their own story books and proudly showed and ‘read’ their stories to family and friends!

How have you printed and saved your children’s narrations? Share with us in the comments.

Blessings,

Narrations 101 Jot & Draw

Narrations are an important principle in a Charlotte Mason education.

I have found that a young child naturally “retells” a good story.

Even a 4-year-old narrates with detail and passion!

All you need to do is find ways of capturing their thoughts.

Here are some practical ways you can collect your child’s narrations ~

Use a blank jotter or notebook ~

 

  • Buy the cheapest newsprint jotter books and cover it with the child’s own art.
  • Paste everything they draw, scribble and copy into this jotter.
  • You may fill several in a year!
  • Write out the story in pencil as they narrate and let them copy over your writing.
  • Draw the title really big and bold and let the child draw a picture under it.

Create a narration notebook for the story/ subject ~

  • Use blank or colored pages.
  • Tea-stain paper and crumple the paper to make it look “old”.
  • Tear or burn the edges for an aged effect.
  • Join a few pages length-wise and roll it up to become a scroll.
  • Re-purpose old telephone books or pages and paint over the printing
  • Staple the pages together at the top/ side with a cardboard cover.
  • Be creative and make a booklet with stick and rubber band – see how to at Susan’s Making Books.com
  • Punch holes and put into a binder/ file.

Draw a picture of the story ~

  • Ask your child to draw while you read aloud.
  • Let them copy the book’s illustrations.  This is a good way of teaching the child to draw.  Some children’s books are so beautifully illustrated that they inspire a child!
  • Add the story title & a date.
  • Write their narration around/under/ next to the picture as they dictate.  Simple narration!
  • Make a collage. Add details found in magazines to a picture.
  • Find clip art or Google pictures or images on the computer and let your child add this to their narration page
  • Make a comic strip – divide the page into 4-6 blocks.  Number the blocks.  This is good practice to sequence the story.

comic strip page

  • Add educational value to the drawing – (if they will allow)
    • punch holes around the edges and let them practise threading/ sewing around the page with wool
    • draw vertical and horizontal squiggly lines through the picture and let them cut on the lines
    • now let the child make their “puzzle” picture up again and paste it in the jotter
    • cut out the main characters and let the child glue them on a colored or painted background.

Read my original post on this topic ~ Mom ~ The Narration Scribe.

Join me in Narration 102 where I share how to type and print your child’s narrations as a booklet.

How do you encourage your young children to record their narrations? Feel free to share in the comments.

Blessings,

Bible ~ Ruth

The Book of Ruth

Here is the “Picture This!” page of the book of Ruth completed by my 10 year-old.

Picture This! Book of Ruth

This was a precious book to study and to rejoice in Jesus our Kinsman-Redeemer!  Ruth’s faithfulness and her modest and obedient behaviour inspired my girls.

This week I let the girls draw their own 0ne-page minibook story.  They did lovely original minibooks:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you need blank one-page minibook templates ~ click here

Freebieoftheday! Famous Impressionist Artists

This year I have decided to focus on Famous Impressionist Artists and created a Famous Impressionist Lapbook with minibooks, biography pages and a wall chart!  I’d love to share this with you.  Here is a complete package for your Famous Impressionist Artist study.

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Famous Impressionist Lapbook ~ Famous Impressionist Artist Lapbook (Downlaod)

A lapbook or notebook & minibook combination, this versatile 18 page pdf. package includes thumbnails of masterpieces, suggested activities, blank minibook templates and an organized lapbook planner for any option using these minibooks. This download will offer enough material for a dedicated study of each artist and their works.

 

These minibooks are blank with  thumbnail pictures of famous masterpieces for each minibook.  This allows the child to make their lapbook and minibooks unique!

More Impressionist Minibooks and activity pages

Artists featured are:

Edgar Degas, Vincent Van Gogh, Georges Seurat, Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Gauguin, Mary Cassatt, Paul Signac, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, Berthe Morisot

And that’s not all … to go with the minibooks …

Famous Impressionist Biography Pages ~

 

Blank Biography Famous Impressionist Artists ~ Our 13 featured artists on blank page. Ideal for minibook combo!

Primary Biography Famous Impressionist Artists ~ The 13 artists with red & blue & dotted grey lines in wider spaces for beginner writers

Black line Biography Famous Impressionist Artists ~ As above with neat black and dotted grey lines for more mature writers.

Display a A4 wall chart ~ Famous Impressionist Wall Chart 2016 (download)
Features one artist a month and a suggested study of his/her works.

I have selected my favourites of their works and have made a mini-gallery for each artist.

Included in the package is a brief biography of each artist  in the 16 page pdf. download.

This A4 page could also be added to a minioffice!

For some more tips, ideas and suggestions on this wall chart download click ~ here

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