CM Too Simple?

Any homeschool parent who is new to Charlotte Mason’s methods could say,

“Surely it couldn’t be this easy and enjoyable?” 

Well, after applying her methods and principles in our homeschooling for over 20 years, I can honestly say, it can be simple, easy and enjoyable!

A Charlotte Mason approach mostly depends on great authors and living books to do much of the teaching, taking the pressure off the parent to be the “fountain-head of all knowledge”.  In fact, Ms Mason instructed the parent to not “get in the way” of a child’s learning.  Her methods gently leads the student to become a self-learner and to love learning.

Based on short lessons with expectation of full attention and best effort on the part of the student,  a CM education focuses on quality over quantity and eliminates all  the busy work and boring worksheets and textbooks,

Charlotte explained, “We are able to get through a greater variety of subjects, and through more work in each subject, in a shorter time than is usually allowed, because children taught in this way get the habit of close attention and are carried on by steady interest” (School Education, p. 240).

Narrations eliminate any need for tests and exams. After listening attentively to the chapter, the child tells back what they remember and understood.  This method is deceptively simple and profoundly effective. Read more here and find a collection of over 100 narration ideas here.

A Charlotte Mason education is rich and wide, offering learning in foreign languages, Nature Study and an emphasis on the Fine Arts. Ms Mason recommended daily time spent outdoors in nature.  Her students kept nature journals and learnt about biology and botany from detailed their observations and reference books.  In a short weekly Fine Arts lesson, her children were regularly exposed to famous musicians, classical music, famous artists and their masterpieces, as well as poetry and Shakespeare in a very simple and enjoyable way.

I discovered that  reading living books was the key to keeping our homeschooling simple and enjoyable.  Good literature, well-written stories, diverse subject matter, noble ideals, following a character’s struggles or discoveries, and exposure to complex vocabulary offered daily opportunity to learn and grow.  It is really that simple and it works.

So don’t make it harder than it is by teaching your children the way you were taught in school. Try and trust and enjoy this delightful way of learning and living alongside your child—the Charlotte Mason way!

Blessings, Nadene

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Bookshelves Our Main Interior Design

We are a family that loves books and we have an enormous book collection.

My husband has an amazing collection of spiritual books; a library of carefully selected authors and titles.  Most my books are English literature and a classic literature collection.  Once we got married, we quickly ran out of shelving space in our first apartment.

As we progressed through parenting and homeschooling, our book collection grew dramatically.  In two of our following homes, we built bookshelves which covered entire walls from floor to ceiling in our studies!

Children’s literature, beautifully illustrated children’s storybooks, board books for toddlers, pop-up books, books with flaps or windows were always on lower shelves where young kids could easily sit and read.

We have always used the local library for most our extra reading material, but where possible, we have invested in our book collection!  During the year, I like to add titles to our online bookseller account wish lists.  I encourage you to buy books as gifts for each child’s birthday or Christmas and encourage your children to develop their own book collection.  Ask grandparents and family to contribute to your children’s library.

While Kindle and EBooks help reduce the need for shelf space and provide easy reading, there is nothing quite like a physical book.  The smell of the pages, the feel of the cover, the weight and page distribution add to the reading experience.

Image result for books under christmas treeRegardless of where your reading comes from, offer your children a variety of reading material; fiction and non-fiction books, biographies, well-written short stories, illustrated books, magazines, and even comics.  Living books are stories filled with detailed descriptions, well-crafted characters, covering amazing adventures, crisis, and courage.  Non-fiction books should not be boring!  These should be fact-filled books related to the author’s personal experiences that cover their travels, observations on geography, sciences, nature and discovery of all living creatures.

But more than shelves that house these precious books and decorate our home, our interior worlds have been dramatically influenced by reading. Good books have inspired, instructed, and, informed our minds and hearts. Books have led us deeper spiritually, and have wonderfully formed our a vision and cultivated a rich lifestyle.

I have said it many times, but if you JUST READ to your children, they will learn! discussions about the story, the settings, the character’s crisis or drama, lead to discoveries, to new ideas and knowledge, which all produce a rich education.

Books have given our children the space to imagine and invent, to dream and design lives that could be.

May you all discover new books wrapped up under your Christmas trees! Wishing you all a restful, grace-filled festive season!

Blessings, Nadene

Living Books Teach!

Many new homeschool parents think a Charlotte Mason’s approach to education seems too simple!  

Read a good book aloud.

Talk about what you have read.

Lesson learned.

This is a Charlotte Mason principle in a nutshell – Read from a living book, give a narration, and you have a wonderful, wholesome education.  Read my posts – Loving Living Books  and Learning through Living Books

So why do new homeschool parents still believe that they have to buy expensive, bell-and-whistles curriculums for their young kids?

They are afraid they won’t teach everything, or that their child won’t learn everything the should, or that they aren’t qualified.   But in truth, no professional curriculum guarantees complete success.  There will always be information gaps, but if you have taught your child to listen attentively while you read aloud to them, they will learn!

How does a baby learn?  From listening and speaking.  And so it is with a literature-based education. You really, really don’t need expensive teaching materials.  If you use literature as a powerful natural method, your children will learn.

While you read to your child from a good book, they listen to the words and learn and develop a wide, rich and mature vocabulary.  They listen to the story unfolding and learn how to structure sentences and develop a flow of connecting ideas, essential for writing skills.  They learn different styles of writing.  They learn how to create interest, describe observations in detail and will learn an amazing amount of information.

Telling back is very simple, yet complex, but it genuinely replaces the need for tests, quizzes or exams.  As you listen to your child narrate or read his narration, you will know immediately what your child knows and understands.

If your child is old enough, his written narrations will form his notes and provide ample evidence of his understanding, all the way to high school and beyond!  They will also develop the most amazing creative writing skills.

My older two daughters graduated from homeschool without ever taking a creative writing course, but they are both incredibly good writers because of the marvellous books that they read. Read the full post “Teach Creative Writing without Lessons“.

Sure, you may need a few workbooks for some subjects like Maths, but for almost every other subject, good books will serve for information, inspiration and motivation.

When your children all chorus, “Please read another chapter,” after you have finished the reading, you will experience the joy of the most wonderful, natural way of learning!

Trust Charlotte Mason’s method.  It truly works!  Please feel free to share your living books learning experiences in the comments.

Blessings, Nadene

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Read Alouds Solve A Lot!

We all have seasons of tough times in our homeschooling.  Read alouds solve almost everything!

If your homeschool days are in the doldrums, start a new read aloud.

If your kids are sick, just read aloud to them.  Find something special they will simply enjoy.

If your days are filled with interruptions, find a moment and read aloud together.

If you are stressed, don’t sweat the small stuff.  Just cuddle together and read aloud.

If you have lost hope in your homeschooling, start afresh and read aloud to your kiddies.

If your child is finding school work too difficult and wants to give up, let him find refreshment and hope in a good read aloud.

It is the glue that holds homeschool together.

You’ll be amazed what reading aloud accomplishes –

  • Amazing learning!  Kids learn and pick up so much through living books.  Themes, topics, facts, ideas and character qualities become life-long lessons. They will learn about great minds, great thoughts and good morals and values.  They will often live it out, act it out, and try it out.  No textbook can ever hope to inspire what great books can inspire!
  • Increased vocabulary – Children love learning new words, and listening to read alouds enlarges their vocabulary, especially with toddlers!  Because new words are heard  in context (in sentences with clues to their meaning), children can express and pronounce new words correctly, fully understanding its meaning.
  • Unity – Nothing brings a family together quite like listening to a great book.  The story brings everyone together and takes them on a journey of exploration, discovery and delight. If your family have ever listened to a radio drama or audio book in the car on a long journey, it is the same experience!
  • Humour – When your homeschooling seems to have hit a wall, start a Roald Dahl or some other funny book .  Nothing revives dulled and dreary souls more that some good laughs!  It will bring the spark back to your family time!  Humour learnt from our read aloud books became an underlying comedy line in our family’s humor.  My kids still quote funny lines from books I read to them when they were young.  And my children, now young adults, still giggle and tease me for my ridiculous Italian and deep Southern American and Spanish accents I used when reading aloud!
  • Continuity – Pick up the story where you left off last, maybe review the last moments,  read on, and the journey continues.  Despite disruptions, delays and interruptions, read alouds hold homeschooling on track.  Even if your children don’t do any seat work (3R’s such as Reading, Writing and Arithmetic) for days, even weeks, they will not fall behind.  If you continue to just read aloud to them they will learn.  I promise that this is true.  I have proved it over and over during my 20+ years of homeschooling.
  • 3rd voice – A read aloud acts as a 3rd party and helps parents “speak” with their children about difficult topics and themes.  This is especially helpful with teens.  A book presents ideas which both the child and parent can talk about without feeling trapped or shy.  Books about purity, modesty, money matters, personal hygiene, logic and reasoning, divorce, death, faith, dangers of social media, etc. deal with tricky issues in an open and non-threatening way.
  • Writing excellence – I have never ever taught my children creative writing lessons, but, through living books and great literature, they have all become incredibly gifted writers.  They imitate what they are regularly exposed to and develop a keen idea of how to write well.  They have a discernment for what is “schlocky” or “trashy” books, and what is good.  I have spoilt my children for cheap, rubbish paperback books for ever!
  • Oral narrations work – If you read aloud to your children and ask them to listen carefully and narrate (tell you back in their own words) what they have just heard, they will make it their own in ways that defy memorizing facts, or learning dry, dull information.  A child who thinks about what she has heard and understood, should express those ideas clearly and simply.  Older children should aim to remember at least 8 things from the reading and try express them in as similar a style as the author penned them.  This is advanced learning that requires focussed attention, massive mental connections and personal interpretation.  It is not easy!  It doesn’t matter if you have “nothing to show” for lessons narrated orally.  Your children will learn well!
  • Keep going – read alouds are for young adults too!  Don’t stop when your kids become teens!  We still read aloud, often at the dinner table, or when we are sewing and doing arts and crafts.  Expand the types of books to read aloud and cover a diverse range of books and topics.
  • Ongoing – Children who enjoy read alouds learn to love books and often develop into bookworms!  Homeschool children who have continuous exposure to books learn to love to read,  and they will keep reading for pleasure and information long into their adult lives.
  • Make it special – Read aloud time is a special time!  We looked forward to joining each other on a cuddly couch after all the seat work was done.  We would gather in a sunny spot with hot chocolate or mug of tea and cookies in winter, or lie in the shade under a tree on hot days with some bubbly water for our read aloud time.  We all had a sense of relief for this time together.  There was no sense of pressure or strain.  Young toddlers are welcome to play quietly nearby, absorbing the story and being part of the learning moments.  Even Dad coming into the house for a tea break, or my young adult daughter, long since graduated, sometimes joined us because our read aloud time was so intimate, and so wonderful.

Start with the easy stuff = read alouds.  Cait at My Little Poppies  shares why you should start your day with the easiest thing.   Begin your day reading aloud and you will accomplish much and solve everything … well, almost everything!

Blessings, Nadene

Artworks inspired by great literature which we sketched and painted .

Love Homeschool!

These photos capture what I love most about homeschool …

Homeschool3

LOVE!

I love reading to my long-legged, lanky 12-year-old while she nestles in my lap.  (Yes!  She loves to still snuggle in my lap!)

I love our mornings filled with cuddles and giggles.

I love my little Miss. Lara and Laura & Little House books!

My youngest is growing up fast, yet she’s still a child who loves to kiss and cuddle and she loves to be loved.  We have had countless loving moments in our homeschooling days.

Recently I remarked how public schooled kids miss out on parental touch and affection while they learn, and how fortunate and blessed we are to love each other throughout our days.

May I, yet again, urge new homeschool moms to relax and enjoy their children and develop deep and intimate school days.  Avoid all those tears and tantrums with tailor-made homeschooling presented in the way that causes your child to blossom and bloom best.  You have a wonderful opportunity to delight yourself alongside your child as he or she learns and discovers, so focus on the subjects and topics they are interested in.

Forget about “doing school at home”. Keep the essential basic lessons (reading, maths, handwriting) short, simple (literally no more than 20 minutes!) and then happily move on to the discovery and discussion subjects.  Find out how to fit all the extras in and add variety by using a theme for each day.

Follow your child’s lead.  Don’t struggle and “make them learn” by forcing lessons that they are not ready for.  Shelve the lessons or books for a month or two and try again later if your child continually cries and complains.  When your child is ready, they learn so fast and enthusiastically that it makes no sense to battle and fight with them and create a negative vibe about school.  Tears and tantrums are a sign of fear.

Don’t compare yourself, your child, your children or others.  Fear of failure is a dreadful result.  While it is easier and makes good sense to work with several children in your family as a group for core subjects, rather approach each child as a complete individual.  Observe and find out how each child prefers to learn new and difficult concepts and approach their learning in the way that best suits them.

My tactile, affectionate, visual, kinesthetic child loves to move, touch and do stuff while she learns.  If she were to sit at the table to do all her homeschool, she would be utterly frustrated, so we do short seat-work lessons and then I allow her to choose what and where she wants to do her core and other lessons.

We took these photos (with a self-timer!) after Bible, maths and spelling.  We sat in the warm sun flooding her bedroom carpet and did our reading and read alouds.  We chatted about topics and themes, we discussed the characters and their fears and successes.

Informal, intimate and incredible!  We realized, once again, that we are blessed to learn and live in such loving liberty.

What do you enjoy most about your homeschooling?

Blessings,

Short and Sweet

When it comes to teaching young children, Miss Charlotte Mason has a winning formula!

  • Use whole books or “living books”
  • Narrations instead of workbooks or tests
  • Focused short lessons
  • Emphasis on excellence
  • Formation of good habits
  • Free afternoons
  • Humanities and a rich education

Recently we eased back into school after a short winter break.  Normally during our first few days, we start out with a Bible lesson, and either just do seat work or “disciplined studies” or 3R’s …

OR

We start our new read aloud and only do oral narrations. After a few days, we fill in few more subjects and lessons until we do a full weekly schedule.

This term my youngest daughter came up with a novel suggestion ~ just do one subject a day.  I thought that she meant our “Theme of the Day“, but she suggested she would only do Maths on Mondays or Social Studies on Tuesday.  When I explained that she would have to do the entire week’s work in that day, she innocently agreed. 

But it was hard.

It was an awful slog.

So many lessons … a whole week of Maths … maths the whole day?

Not fun!

When we do our normal school day we just do just one lesson.  Lessons are short; no longer than 20 minutes. Work is focused and done diligently.  Children master their lessons and complete it with a positive attitude.

Long lessons drain and exhaust a young child.  Children become demoralized.  Their passion and enthusiasm dwindle away.

My daughter quickly agreed to go back to her normal school schedule.

May I suggest that your children are more motivated and positive when they have short, sweet lessons.

I fact, in my teaching experience, the best way to encourage children to get going on a topic or lesson is to limit their time.  Instead of giving a whole period for a lesson, I set a limited time and a specific goal.  Once we reached the time limit, we moved onto the next goal and set a short, but manageable time.

Here are more benefits of short, sweet lessons:

  • Dawdling eliminated
  • Encourage concentration
  • Stay focused
  • Form the habit of doing their best first time and every time
  • Motivated by manageable length lessons
  • Variety stimulates inborn curiosity
  • Tedious lessons eliminated so that success and achievement are intrinsic motivation
  • Mastery of concepts and skills
  • ADHD and easily distracted children learn to stay connected for the short manageable lessons
  • Completed seat work leads to the “enjoyable, best parts” like read alouds, fine arts, nature study or handicrafts
  • Reduced tears and tantrums, especially when working through difficult subjects or concepts.
  • Rewards of free afternoons and time outdoors
  • Routine and schedule are reassuring to young children

So, this week, my daughter is happy to announce that all her maths is done, but she is very happy to return to our normal short, sweet lessons!

Another thought:

My high school daughter likes to immerse herself in one subject at a time.  She often teaches herself the entire term’s work on one subject, doing her lessons all day and for a week or more, until she is ready to write her exams.  Once completed, she moves on to another subject.  She maintains that she obtains a better global view of her subject, masters the work, retains her skills and is more motivated.

What works for you?  What works for your young children?  Do your older children like to study comprehensively or do a little every day?

Feel free to share or comment.

Blessings,

Record Read Alouds

This year I am S.T.R.E.T.C.H.E.D.

My eldest daughter is completing her Matric (South Africa’s final school year) with Impak (a fully recognized accredited correspondence course) in October/ November.  She has asked me to tutor her in 2 of her 7 subjects and to support her as my primary focus.

My 13-year-old started her high school career, also with Impak, and wants to work as independently as she can, but needs help transitioning in new subjects & methods.  This is a textbook-type education, with an emphasis on graded assignments, tests and exams.  Until this year, we have followed a strong Charlotte Mason approach with living books and we used narrations as our assessments.  She needs upgrades in her summarizing. study methods and exam techniques.  Also, Maths is very intense, with little or no examples and guidance, so I have to tutor her too.

Leaving Miss.L waiting her turn in her school work.  At times, she works on Spelling City on her own and does some maths unassisted, but most our homeschooling is one-on-one, and almost all our core is based on read alouds and living books.

I just couldn’t help everyone at the same time!

I found a solution ~ record her read alouds!https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR28xx5FlivM5laEZ5Ih47mPtYYCM_hEscIV9mGbpoBIpVpUI8u7JbX1mnQbQ

With excellent step-by-step instructions from WikiHow.com I was able to record 3 chapters of our current book. Using my Windows 7 sound recorder on my laptop, I could record my chapters without any apparatus or sound equipment.

I simply created an Audio Book Folder for the specific book in my homeschool files and saved each chapter as I went along.  If interrupted, simply stop, and start a new file, continuing with the same chapter, making a new page reference.https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRoFW4Mw5AAPEKRAAKHpwgLkBTReYMwC2lnVBrcB9TShw7wSmUPM3pDvk6o

I need to set some time aside and record the rest of the book, but I found that it went fairly quickly.

To listen, I simply loaded the chapters on a flash stick and Miss.L inserted this into her CD player’s USB port, and listened quietly in her room to the chapter while I spent time with my other daughters. I could also burn the story on a CD or MP3 disk, or drop the files into our Dropbox so she can listen on the desktop computer.  We all use headphones to listen quietly in the same room.

She simply narrated what she heard when I joined her a little later.

My youngest absolutely LOVES audio books!  My purchase of a HomeschoolFreebieOfTheDay.com & HomeschoolRadioShows.com subscription has been the best deal e.v.e.r.  She loves to listen to stories while she plays with her dolls or draws or creates.

So, recording her core read alouds is a real investment – she can listen to them again, and again!

And I can multi-task.

A great practical idea!

(I want to add ~ reading aloud is our homeschool ‘glue’, and the most intimate part of our day.  We read, snuggled together, and enjoy the journey as a family.  This is not replaced by an audio recording.  I still read the other books scheduled for the day with my child.)

Have you any good tips for teaching multiple ages?  Have you any multi-tasking ideas? Please share in the comments.

Blessings,

Read Books ~ When All Else Fails

Social Studies (Carla Bley album)

Living Books are the

golden threads” in our learning.

This past week I had an epiphany ~

good books have provided my children the most valuable education!

But, let me go back a little and explain …

Earlier this year my 12-year-old-now-nearly-13-teen floundered in my ‘wonderful’ Charlotte Mason education.  I wrote about our stresses and struggles and how I felt like such a failure.

Your kind comments overwhelmed me.

I simply relieved my daughter from some CM subjects and she focussed purely on her academics. (She no longer actively takes part in many of the Fine Arts lessons, but I’m sure that she absorbs her younger sister’s music and art appreciation lessons, the poetry and the Shakespeare plays.)

Most of her Footprints Into the 21st Century curriculum is literature-based. She spends many hours simply reading good books.

But, still, I worried.  I was still unhappy to see her listlessly “going through the motions” instead of connecting with her subject, let alone savoring it! (And I’m not alone. Jimmie also shared of her daughter’s changed approach.)

Would she be ready for the standards and approaches used in our Delta correspondence high school curriculum next year?

Mathematics

Last week, when she completed her Maths textbook I went to a local academic book store to find a new Grade 8 textbook.

To my dismay, they only supplied textbooks for the current OBE education in the South African government schools.  (This system – Outcomes Based Education – has been an absolute failure … but let me not digress.)
After 20 minutes I chose the one which seemed the best.

When I got home and took my time looking through the book, I was appalled.

It was complete drivel. Total twaddle. Not one single mathematical concept explained. Not a single theory, principle, or equation in the book. Not a single example followed by an exercise.  How does anyone learn maths from this?

I would not keep the book and the store would not refund me.  I had to exchange it for any other book from the same publishers.  Despite their thick catalogue, and much more careful examination of the sample books on the bookstore’s shelves, I could not find anything worth exchanging.

Their Social Studies book dismayed me.

Not a single photograph or accurate map …  instead they had fuzzy pencil sketch copies of photos.

Not a single quote …  just ridiculous, over-simplified explanations of the period in history summed up in 3 paragraphs, followed by 3 questions &/or activities to be done with a friend or in a group OBE-style.

This is when it stuck me!

My children know much more about the historical events, the culture, lifestyle, and important people from their living books!

Even if my junior-high daughter just ticks off her schedule and completes her tasks, simply because she reads excellent books, she will have absorbed 1000 times more than a child who has read a textbook.

And I should have given more credit to the power of reading!

I’ve written that read alouds are the Homeschool Glue.

I have seen the power of reading an excellent book to ignite thoughts, inspire the imagination, develop vocabulary, motivate action, and define character.

At its most basic, if our children read living books, they will grow and learn!

This is why I love a Charlotte Mason-inspired-literature-based education.

How have living books taught your children? Any thoughts about textbooks? Share with us in the comments.

Blessings,

This post is part of the upcoming Charlotte Mason Carnival ~  “What we love most about a Charlotte Mason education“.  To join the carnival, visit Amy at Fisher Academy International this Tuesday, September 4.

Learning Through Living Books

Books on mathematics and natural science in Se...

Take a good story,

fill it with fascinating characters,

surround these in historical and geographic details,

place it in detailed natural surroundings

add the hero’s moral crisis and growth,

submerge this in rich vocabulary,

and you have

an unforgettable

living book!

Over the 14 years or so of homeschooling I have discovered the easiest, richest education is through living books.

With living books as our core, we read and enjoy the content and characters, and branch off on any and many interesting studies as we go along.

Jimmie summed up this in a nugget,

“Just give me the books. We can read them, narrate them, notebook them, and choose our own topics for in-depth tangents.”

I am happily re-using my South African History curriculum “Footprints On Our Land” with my youngest.  Although she floated along on our first Footprints journey, she was only a young 5-year-old then, and missed much of the detail and content. 

We snuggle together and read, atlas at hand, and talk and narrate about the culture, lifestyle, history, geography and natural science that we discover through the story.

Now and then we branch off to study something in-depth (like we did recently with the moon cycle) or sit at the table to write narrations on notebook pages or in lapbooks.

My daughter loves the read alouds.  It is her favorite part of her school day. And, remarkably, she learns so much this way.  It may seem informal, but it is foundational.

You do not need a fancy curriculum, detailed schedules, flashcards, posters and all the bells and whistles!  You can select several age-appropriate literature books for your children and base your studies around these.

For moms with very young children, you could simply use a richly illustrated children’s treasury of classic stories and read … read … read aloud every day.

Living books will ignite the flame of interest and a love to learn in your children’s hearts and minds.

Please feel free to share your living books learning experiences in the comments.

Blessings,

Loving Living Books

Our home is typical of literature-loving people – we have stacks of books; shelves and racks of books, and thanks to our Charlotte Mason-inspired homeschooling, we love them all!  20151210_180943

There is nothing so life-enriching as reading good books!

My children love me reading aloud and they beg me to “keep on, Mom!”  Our most special times are when we snuggle together and enjoy a good book.  Even my eldest who has read the book many years before, comes and lies with us as I read a chapter aloud each night before their bedtime.  And every night, I have to tell my middle schooler to switch off her lamp and stop reading long after her bedtime.

I written several times about my youngest emerging reader who really works hard to learn to read, and who amazes me with her dedication to reading!

And I wish to devote this post to her:

“You have heard me read stories aloud before you were born and you have loved stories from the start.  You were just a toddler and pulled me down to the carpet or cushion with the book we’re reading and reminded me to read together with you – every – day.  Hardly a school day has gone by where we haven’t read together. We have read picture books, faerie tales, nursery rhymes, classic tales, 3D and pop-up books, legends and fables, non-fiction books and look-for-the hidden-thing-books  …

We all marvel at your devotion to reading.  You read slowly, guessing, looking at the pictures for clues, and with toe-curling frustration, you get stuck and need our help.  For months and months you have told us that you love to read and I can see that you are nearly there!

You just need a few more months practice or maybe an easy-to-read-on-your-own book, and you’ll be reading on your own!

And a whole new world will open up to you!  Magical kingdoms, mysteries and surprises, noble men and heroes, ideas and images, places and people, countries and creatures, thoughts and concepts that will transport you out of your room and into another realm.  Oh, what wonder lies out there in the world of living books.

Just this week you dictated your first creative story to me.  You are busy reading “The Sword in the Tree” by Clyde Robert Bulla  and you love the Medieval themes, the suspense and the mystery.  Even though it is a “boy’s story”, you’re hooked!  And it has filled your mind and imagination with Medieval ideas.  Now, you have your first story,  The Knight’s Tale.  I love the clip art pictures and that pretty font you chose, and how you floated away on a high with your story to show everyone.

Such joy!

http://thestarvingarthistorian.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/the-lady-of-shalott-waterhouse1888.jpg

May your reading grow and flow.

May books of wonder and delight enrich your life!

May your growing vocabulary continue to amaze adult  listeners as you use words you read and heard.

May you grow in character, inspired by those who shared their lives in autobiographies and true life stories.

May your own shelves one day be filled with Living Books.

Above all, may you know the Lord, revealed in His Word.

He is the best Word to read.

The Living Word.

All my Love,

From your literature-loving, book-sharing, reading-aloud-with-funny-acents-mom!

I am sharing this post on the Charlotte Mason Carnival hosted by Amy at Fisher Academy.

Blessings,