When your child doesn’t want to read the suggested book?

In our Charlotte Mason homeschooling, we followed literary-based learning curriculums, learning through recommended lists of living books.

It is inevitable that not every recommended book in the curriculum will appeal to every child, and we have had our share of books that just didn’t “fit” some of us.

Young children and middle schoolers often have a preference for certain gender characters, and my young girls often groaned when I started another story featuring a young boy as the main character.

Some aspects of History don’t appeal. My younger teenagers did not enjoy political history section of their Footprints curriculum.  And although I insisted on their reading every book on the schedule, I realized that they did not connect with the narrative or the information shared through the story.  Because I related so emotionally to some of these stories, I expected that they would as well, and I was disappointed in their unfazed attitudes.  It took me a while to realize that it was a waste of time to insist on the reading when they were uninterested.

Some literary styles don’t appeal. Some children prefer action, others love descriptive passages, and others love dynamic dialogue.  By the time they reach junior high, my children had a very keen sense of good books and they quickly refused poorer literature that they called “schlock”.

There have been books that I absolutely dreaded reading.  The chapters were long and the narrative terribly tedious.  I even fell asleep while reading aloud!  I couldn’t manage to drag myself through the required reading every day.  Eventually, I admitted defeat and put aside the book and looked for alternative ways of covering the subject matter.

From several bad experiences, I learnt that it doesn’t help to plod and slog on through a book when a child or mom has disengaged. It is a complete waste of time. Rather look for different options.

Here are some ways to approach a roadblock book-block ~

  1. Put away the book and look for something similar at your local library.
  2. Find audiobooks but ensure that they are well narrated.
  3. Look for suitable children’s movies or DVDs, especially if you are covering a specific historical era.
  4. Make a curated YouTube video playlist of suitable, relevant videos on the subject or era.  (Always preview and block adverts if you can.)
  5. Find relevant newspaper and magazine articles.
  6. Look up Wikipedia for specific people, dates, events and situations etc.
  7. Find someone who lived through that experience and encourage your children to interview them.
  8. Visit a museum or workshop.
  9. Do a road trip and go on an outing to the actual place.
  10. Look for photos and letters and memoirs of the time, place or period.
  11. If all else fails, simply move on.

Don’t worry about the gaps. We all have them! Even folks studying for their master’s degrees in a subject don’t know everything about their field of study!

Ditch the guilt and look for what your child is really fascinated by and interested in and follow their spark with food that flames their passion. This is what works!

Blessings as you find what works, Nadene

2 thoughts on “When your child doesn’t want to read the suggested book?

  1. This is so true. I did have a little laugh when you mentioned falling asleep whilst reading a book as I have done that too, although my excuse is that I had a baby who was a few weeks old at the time. There are so many amazing books out there for children now, we have so much choice that if our children don’t like what we offer there will usually be a really good alternative – although sometimes they are hard to find x

    Like

    • @sustainablemum We are blessed when we have the freedom to find alternatives for our children and ourselves instead of feeling as if we have somehow failed to meet the curriculum’s program. Blessings!

      Like

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